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LISTED BELOW ARE THE INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR UPCOMING SEMESTERS.  AS YOU CONTINUE TO SCROLL DOWN YOU WILL FIND ASSIGNMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMESTERS:

 

  • Fall 2015 Incoming Student Courses
  • Fall 2015 Initial Assignments

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 INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR FALL 2015 INCOMING STUDENTS 

 

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Please review your schedule and complete the assignments for your assigned classes.

 

Course

Assignment

Civil Procedure I
§103.1

Professor Rierson

This assignment will cover class on Tuesday, August 18, and Thursday, August 20.

 

Read Jonathan Harr, A Civil Action.  We will use the lawsuit described in this book to illustrate many of the procedural issues addressed in the course. 

 

Read pp. 3-36 (Introduction) and 39-88 (Subject Matter Jurisdiction - Diversity) in Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Glannon), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.2

Professor Deo

Read Introduction: Freer 1-10, 15-18; Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (FRCP) 1.

 

Read Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Federal Question: Freer 177-180, 214-218 n.1, 222-230; 28 U.S.C. 1331, 1338; U.S. Constitution Art. III, Sec. 2.

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.3

Professor Cromer Young

Read pp. 13-16 through note 5, excluding note 3; 18; 89-94; 97-98 n. 5; 106-115; and 123-4 in Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Glannon), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

 

Read the U.S. Constitution, Art. III sec. 2; 28 U.S.C. 1331, and 1338.

 

Contracts I
§101.1

Professor Templin

 

A printed version of the Reading for the First Week of Classes PDF is available for pick-up on the 7th Floor from the faculty assistants.

 

Contracts I
§101.2

Professor Lee

Read pp. 1-17 and complete problem 1-1 in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

Contracts I
§101.3

Professor Greene

No Initial Assignments

 

Criminal Law
§105.2

Dean Keller

(1) Read as background information for the course:

·                      Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 1 - 19 (stop at “The Presentation of Evidence”)

·                      Dressler, Understanding Criminal Law, §§3.01 to 3.03

 

(2) Read and be prepared to discuss:

·                      Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 31-36 (“Proof Beyond Reasonable Doubt” through note 4)

 

·                      Readings on Theories of Punishment, in Casebook:

A. Introduction: 75-82; Why Punish? Introductory Note, at 89-91

B. Utilitarian View: 91-93

C. Retribution: 93-100 (through Note on Retribution as Constraint)

D. Deterrence: 111-114

E. Rehabilitation: Vitiello and Moore, 115-116; Note – Does Rehabilitation Work?, at 117-118

F. Incapacitation: 120-124

 

(3)  Register for this course on TWEN. (You will learn about TWEN and Westlaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation.)  Prepare your answers for the Worksheet on Theories of Punishment – see TWEN Criminal Law – Keller coursepage under Syllabus/Schedule of Assignments. 

 

Lawyering Skills

All sections

All Professors

Register for this course on TWEN. (You will learn about TWEN and Westlaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation.)

Read Lindh v. Surman (in Reading Like a Lawyer and posted on TWEN).

Review Chapter 10-12 in Reading Like a Lawyer (McKinney), 2nd Edition, Carolina Academic Press.

Review Chapter 15, pp. 149-158 in Expert Learning for Law Students (Schwartz), 2nd Edition, Carolina Academic Press.

Legal Writing I
§099.1 & §099.5

Professor Day

No Initial Assignment

Legal Writing I
§099.2 & §099.6

Professor Durst

Read chapter 1 and prepare exercise 1B for class discussion in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.3

Professor Rierson

Read pp. 3-9 (Rules and Policies), 11-22 (Sources of Law), 43-53 (Precedent and Stare Decisis) and complete exercises 2-A, 2-B, 4-A, 4-B, and 4-C in chapters 2 and 4 for review in class in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 9-19 (The US Legal System) in Just Research: Preparing for Practice (Enquist), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.4

Professor Christensen

Read chapters 1-3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.7

Professor Slattery

For the first class session, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A-E below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title) as you will use the template answer form posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignment described in item C below.  You will learn how to use TWEN during your orientation.  Note also that your first assignment is due by 11:59pm on the night before our first class.

 (a) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end);

(b) read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook;

(c) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type (or word process) your answers, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; in addition to your reasoning skills and ability to spot and follow directions, I use these assignments to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please also spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(d) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(e) Point your web browser to www.questionpress.com/prof_slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer both the reflective prompt and questionnaire you’ll find posted there.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.8

Professor Wildenthal

Class 1 (week of Aug 17):

     Read pp. 3-22 and 43-50 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

     Read pp. 5 and 131 – 142 in The Process of Legal Research (Kunz), 8th Edition, Aspen

 

Class 2 (week of Aug 17):

     Read pp. 23-42 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen (some

     additional assignments announced later).

 

Torts I
§111.1 & §111.4

Professor Dyson

Read Battery (beginning with Wallace v. Rosen) p. 31-37, & Assault, p. 37-41 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.
 

Read pp. 3-4 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Optional bur recommended: Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault, in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen (Optional, but recommended).

Torts I
§111.2 & §111.3

Professor Bisom-Rapp

Register for this course on TWEN. (You will learn about TWEN and Westlaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation.) Spend some time before class perusing my TWEN webpage.

 

Read pp. 1-4 (Introduction), 17-20 (Concept of Intent), notes 22-24 (do not read Spivey), and 24-28 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 3-4 (1.01A-C) and 5-6 (1.01 E-F) in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

 

 

 

INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR FALL 2015 - UPDATED 8.11.15

 

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Please review your schedule and complete the assignments for your assigned classes.

 

 

INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS

FALL 2015

Course

Assignment

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure

§261.1

Professor Steinberg

 

 Chemerinsky, Read pages 5-12, The Criminal Process

                      Read pages 22-24, Incorporation of the Bill of Rights

                      Read pages 24 - 27, Duncan v. Louisiana

Administrative Law

§250.1

Professor Templin

Casebook: Administrative Procedure and Practice: Problems and Cases, 4th Edition. (Funk, Shapiro, and Weaver)

Note: We are using an older edition of the casebook (4th edition). Make sure that you do not purchase the current edition. There are plenty of copies of the 4th edition – both new and used – available via Amazon.com and on other venues. Contract Professor Templin if you are having difficulties locating a copy.

First class: pp. 1- 32.  Prepare the problems.

ADR Competition

§425.1

Professor Waldman

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Advanced Criminal Law - Vice Law

Professor Kaye

§470.1

Sign up for TWEN. The initial assignment is posted there.

Advanced Legal Research

§297.1

Professor Inman

Join the TWEN course, found under Advanced Legal Research 297.2, Fall 2015, Inman.  Complete the CALI lessons, Legal Research 101: The Tools of the Trade AND Introduction to Search Logic and Strategies.  Use the links provided in "CALI Lesson Links" on the TWEN page; Do not go directly to CALI, as I will not be able to see your results if you don’t use the link I’ve provided.  Complete the lessons as many times as needed to score at least 70% on each to get credit.  If you haven’t used CALI before and need to register for a CALI account, the authorization code can be found on the class TWEN course under “CALI Lesson Links – How to Access CALI”.

 

 

Advanced Mediation

§419.1

Professor Waldman

 Register for this class on TWEN.

 

Students should watch the Brene Brown Ted Talk on Vulnerability at http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability and be ready to discuss what the talk has to do with mediation.

 

Class One: Brief Review of the Mediation Process: Preparation for Small Claims Discussion of Brene Brown Ted talk on vulnerability and courage.

Also, students should bring their calendars to class and be ready to sign up for their slots at court.

 

 

American Legal History

§217.1

Professor Vandevelde

 

Register for the course on TWEN.  Under course materials on the TWEN site, find Assignment #1 and read three documents: the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the excerpt from John Locke's Treatise on Civil Government. 

 

Read pages 7-10 in The Magic Mirror: Law in American History (Hall), 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.

Business Associations

§115.1

Professor Winchester

Purchase a Turning Point Technologies clicker.

Register for Business Associations - Winchester on TWEN.

Read the following portions in Kleinberger: Pages 1-4, 7-16, and 17-52.  You are advised to consult Class 1 Worksheet first.  See instruction 4 below.

Do Class 1 Worksheet, which is available on TWEN.

 

Business Associations

§115.2

Professor Tiefenbrun

Register for Business Associations-Tiefenbrun on TWEN.

Read the following portions in Kleinberger 4th edition: Pages 1-4, 7-16, and 17-52. Or Kleinberger 3rd edition: Pages 1-4, 6-14, 16-45.

Consult Class 1 Worksheet first .Do Class 1 Worksheet which is available on TWEN. The link to the Restatement Third of Agency is on this initial assignment sheet below. This Initial Assignment Sheet is on Twen.

The link to the RESTATEMENT Third of Agency is:

https://a.next.westlaw.com/Browse/Home/SecondarySources/RestatementsPrinciplesoftheLaw/RestatementoftheLawAgency

 

California Civil Procedure

§202.1

Professor S. Smith

Levine text, pages 1-8, 22-31, 37-39 and 47-58

 

NOTE: Professor Smith will be out of town on Wednesday, August 19 so the first day of class will be on August 26, with a make-up class to be scheduled later in the semester.

 

California Evidence

§225.1

Professor Atkins

1.) Before the first class, read through the California Evidence Code. This will provide you with a good foundation and overview for the upcoming classroom sessions.

 

2.) Read the class syllabus. It is posted on the Docket.

 

3.) Textbook assignment: pages 1-34 of California Evidence Examples & Explanations by Chris Chambers Goodman, including the examples and explanations.

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.1

Professor Rierson

This assignment will cover class on Tuesday, August 18, and Thursday, August 20.

 

Read Jonathan Harry, A Civil Action.  We will use the lawsuit described in this book to illustrate many of the procedural issues addressed in the course. 

 

Read pp. 3-36 (Introduction) and 39-88 (Subject Matter Jurisdiction - Diversity) in Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Glannon), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

Civil Procedure I
§103.2

Professor Deo

Read Introduction: Freer 1-10, 15-18; Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (FRCP) 1.

 

Read Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Federal Question: Freer 177-180, 214-218 n.1, 222-230; 28 U.S.C. 1331, 1338; U.S. Constitution Art. III, Sec. 2.

Civil Procedure I
§103.3

Professor Cromer Young

Read pp. 13-16 through note 5, excluding note 3; 18; 89-94; 97-98 n. 5; 106-115; and 123-4 in Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Glannon), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

 

Read the U.S. Constitution, Art. III sec. 2; 28 U.S.C. 1331, and 1338.

Civil Procedure II
§104.1 & §104.2

Professor Cromer Young

Sign up for this course on TWEN and read pp. 3-33, client intake (to be posted on TWEN).  Further assignments will be posted on TWEN.

 

Review Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8, 9, 11, and 12(b) (locate all cited rules/statutes through Westlaw or Google).

Civil Procedure II
§104.3

Professor Slomanson

Read book or see movie, A Civil Action, starring John Travolta (1998). CD on Reserve, upon request.  

Community Property

§167.1

Professor Klueck

Read pp. 53-96,  in Community Property in California (Blumberg), 6th Edition, Aspen

 

Be prepared to answer the question: What do the deliberations of the California Constitutional Convention (p. 55-58) say about the role and legal status of women in mid-nineteenth century California/America?

Comparative Criminal Procedure Through Film

§647.1

Professor Bettwy

8/17/15 - Class No. 1 – Comparative Legal Analysis / Foreign Law / Common Law Tradition

Register in course on TWEN.

Before reading/viewing, review the questions for discussion (click here)

 

Textbook: 1-14, 289-92, 315-17, 371, 376-80

                Foreign law in U.S. courts (see TWEN for links to these short readings):

Rule of Law Handbook, pp. 83-89 (scan 89-94)

Proving foreign law:

                Calif. Evid. Code §§ 310, 311, 452, 454

                Fed. R. Civ. P. 44.1

                Fed. R. Crim. P. 26.1

Use of prior foreign convictions (Calif. Penal Code § 668)

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act "local law" defense (15 U.S.C. § 78dd-1(c)(1))

The doctrine of "dual criminality" in extradition cases (pp. 3-4)

 

                Watch one of the following films (try to watch both):

                                Witness for the Prosecution (U.K.) (Netflix) (Amazon $2.99) (iTunes $2.99)

                I Confess (Canada) (Amazon $2.00) (iTunes $2.99)

 

 

Constitutional Law I

§135.1 & 135.2

Professor Herald

Register for the course on TWEN and review the course content and syllabus.

 

Skim pp. 3-16, read pp. 16-26, and pp. 26-33 (Marbury v. Madison) in Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Optional: Read pp. 37-45 (Treatise) in Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies (Chemerinsky), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

If you don’t already have one, you must purchase a Response Card Keypad (clicker) and bring your keypad to the first day of class.  Used keypads may be sold or purchased on the student’s Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds.  New keypads can be purchased by logging onto http://store.turningtechnologies.com using the school code "g8Rd" (case sensitive) to receive the TJSL discounted price.  Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option; you must have a keypad for this class.  One keypad will work for multiple classes.  New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

 

Constitutional Law I

§135.3

Professor Vandevelde

Skim the U.S. Constitution, which appears in the casebook beginning at page 3, in order to see how it is organized and what kinds of topics are addressed in it. 

Read Marbury v. Madison, this appears in the casebook beginning at page 26.

 

Constitutional Law II

§136.1

Professor Guzelian

No initial assignment

Contracts I
§101.1

Professor Templin

A printed version of the Reading for the First Week of Classes PDF is available for pick-up on the 7th Floor from the faculty assistants.

 

 

Contracts I
§101.2

Professor Lee

Read pp. 1-17 and complete problem 1-1 in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

Contracts I
§101.3

Professor Greene

No initial assignment

Contracts II

§102.1

Professor Golden

Handout: Introduction to the Parol Evidence Rule (Available on The Docket)

Casebook: pp. 405 - 420

Supplement (Selections for Contracts):

Restatement 2nd of Contracts: §§209-218

Uniform Commercial Code: §§2-202; 2-209(2)

 

Contracts II

§102.2

Professor Greene

No initial assignment

Contracts Drafting

§465.1

Professor Templin

Book: Drafting Contracts: How and Why Lawyers Do What They Do by Tina Stark (2d Edition, Aspen 2013).

NOTE: This is a problem based course and you must use the current edition. 

 

First class assignment:

Chapter 1 – A Few Words…

Chapter 2 – The Building Blocks of Contracts

Chapter 3 – Translating the Business Deal – Part 1

Chapter 4 – Translating the Business Deal – Part 2

Chapter 5 – A Contract’s Parts

 

First meeting: This course meets online on Thursdays from 1 pm to 2:15 pm. Instructions will be sent to you by the first week of classes on how to sign up for the online classroom.

 

Contracts Drafting

§465.2

Professor Casalins

Chapter 1 – A Few Words

Chapter 2 – The Building Blocks of Contracts

Chapter 3 – Translating the Business Deal – Part 1

Chapter 4 – Translating the Business Deal – Part 2

Chapter 5 – A Contract’s Parts § 5.1-5.9

 

NOTE: Professor Casalins will be out of town on Friday, August 21 so the first day of class will be on August 28, with a make-up class to be scheduled later in the semester.

 

Copyright Law

§313.1

Professor West

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Criminal Law
§105.1

Professor Kaye

For our first day of class, please complete Topics 1 and 2, below.  For our second day of class, please complete Topic 3.  All page numbers are in the 9th Edition of our casebook, unless otherwise noted.  

READING FOR CLASS #1

Topic 1: Background Reading

Note: These Topic 1 readings are background material about the criminal justice system. We will not discuss these readings in a systematic way during our first week, but we will occasionally refer to them throughout the semester, and you will need to know the material in these readings in order to fully understand many of the materials we read and discuss throughout the semester. I will also consider these materials fair game for any tests we have this semester.

The Structure of the Criminal Justice System, pp. 1-8
Criminal Justice Procedures, pp. 8-12
Note on Formal Trial Procedure, pp. 17-19
In re Winship and notes, pp. 31-36
The Burden of Production Versus The Burden of Persuasion, p. 41
Presumptions, pp. 46-47

Knowledge Goals: Learn (1) the basic structure of our criminal justice system, (2) basic criminal justice procedures, (3) basic trial procedures, (4) the reasonable doubt standard, (5) burdens in criminal cases, and (6) presumptions in criminal cases.

Topic 2: Elemental Analysis In The Criminal Law

Reading and Exercises: Elemental Analysis In The Criminal Law (Handout available on TWEN).

Knowledge Goals: Learn the basic structure of the definition of a crime and its elements.

Skill Goals: (1) Reading and parsing criminal law statutes, (2) identifying the elements of a crime, (3) analyzing whether the facts in a fact-pattern satisfy the elements of the crime.

READING FOR CLASS #2

 Topic 3: Analyzing The Mental State Element – The Basics

Model Penal Code, § 2.02, pp. 1202-03
Note on the Model Penal Code Reforms, pp. 252-53
Comment to § 2.02 & Note 1, pp. 253-56
Exercise: Model Penal Code Mental States (Handout available on TWEN)
Dressler §§ 10.01, 10.04[A][1], [A][3][A], [B], [C], [D], [E], 10.06

Knowledge Goals: Learn (1) the role of the mental state element in the definition of a crime, (2) the four basic Model Penal Code mental state terms, (3) several common law mental state terms, and (4) several rules of statutory interpretation pertaining to mental states.

Skill Goals: (1) Reading and parsing complex criminal law statutes, (2) applying rules of statutory interpretation regarding mental states, and (3) analyzing whether the facts in a fact-pattern satisfy a crime’s mental state element.

 

Criminal Law
§105.2

Professor Keller

(1) Read as background information for the course:

  • Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 1 - 19 (stop at “The Presentation of Evidence”)
  • Dressler, Understanding Criminal Law, §§3.01 to 3.03

 

(2) Read and be prepared to discuss:

  • Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 31-36 (“Proof Beyond Reasonable Doubt” through note 4)

 

  • Readings on Theories of Punishment, in Casebook:

A. Introduction: 75-82; Why Punish? Introductory Note, at 89-91

B. Utilitarian View: 91-93

C. Retribution: 93-100 (through Note on Retribution as Constraint)

D. Deterrence: 111-114

E. Rehabilitation: Vitiello and Moore, 115-116; Note – Does Rehabilitation Work?, at 117-118

F. Incapacitation: 120-124

 

(3)  Prepare your answers for the Worksheet on Theories of Punishment – see TWEN Criminal Law – Keller coursepage under Syllabus/Schedule of Assignments.

 

 

Criminal Procedure

§106.1

Professor Kreit

 

Read pages 1-24;27 Participants, Stages and Purposes of Procedural Rules

 

Criminal Procedure

§106.2

Professor Steinberg

Read:

(Tomkovicz) pp. 3-4, Introductory Note, pp. 5-9, Katz v. United States, pp. 10-16, United States v. White.

 

The Open Fields Doctrine: Oliver v. United States (Supplementary Materials)

 

Optional Reading: (Dressler) pp. 70-91

 

 

 

Critical Race Theory

§373.1

Professor Wenger

Derrick Bell, After We’re Gone, CE at 9

Michael Olivas, The Chronicles, CE at 15 Carbado & Harris, New Racial Preferences, CE at 25

TWEN: Excerpts from How to Write a Student Article.

 

Employment Discrimination

§276.1

Professor Lee

1) Pager & Western, Race at Work: Realities of Race and Criminal Record in the NYC Job Market, December 2005, available online at http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/pager/files/race_at_work.pdf .  Please read the full paper.

and

 

2) Russell K. Robinson, Perceptual Segregation, 108 Colum. L. Rev. 1093 (2008).  Please read the Introduction and Parts I and II of the article on pages 1093 to 1139.  This article is available online at http://scholarship.law.berkeley.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1033&context=facpubs.  It is also available on Lexis or Westlaw using the citation "108 Colum. L. Rev. 1093."

 

Entertainment Law

§237.1

Professor Greene

No initial assignment

Entertainment Law Transactions

§336.1

Professor Novak

No Initial Assignment

Evidence

§138.1

Professor Cohn

Read pp. 68-77 and 79-106 in Evidence; Cases and Materials (Park), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Read the Ruling on Fuhrman Tapes (California v. O.J. Simpson).  There is a copy available on course reserve in the library.

 

 

 

 

Evidence

§138.2

Professor Kreit

 

Introduction and Anatomy of a Trial: pages 3-10

Witnesses: pages 10-16

The Role of the July: pages 16-24

Externship

§697.1, §698.1, &§699.1

Professor Tropp

Be sure you have completed and turned in your fall 2015 Enrollment Form.

Federal Courts & Jurisdiction

§388.1

Professor Wildenthal

Class 1 (Tue Aug 18):

 

Note: Aside from the required paperback supplement that you must purchase, Federal Courts Stories (FCS) (Jackson & Resnik eds, Foundation, 2010), the primary required readings (such as key cases) will be provided free of charge by Professor Wildenthal through a Google Drive link which should be available by mid-July. Feel free to email Prof. Wildenthal (bryanw@gmail.com) with any questions; he can also email you assigned cases directly.

 

Assigned reading:

 

Hans v. Louisiana, 134 U.S. 1 (1890): read the Statement of the Case, pp. 1-3, Justice Bradley’s opinion of the Court, pp. 9-21, and Justice Harlan’s concurrence, p. 21.

 

Class 2 (Thurs. Aug 20):

 

Assigned reading:

 

Ex parte Young, 209 U.S. 123 (1908):

 

read the Statement of the Case, pp. 126-34;

 

parts of Justice Peckham’s opinion of the Court, pp. 142-43 (through 1st  on p. 143), pp. 145-50 (2nd  break on p. 145 to last  break on p. 150), pp. 153-54 (from 1st  break on p. 153), pp. 159-60 (to 1st  break on p. 160), and pp. 161-68 (from last break on p. 161); and

 

parts of Justice Harlan’s dissent, pp. 168-69 (to 1st  break on p. 169), pp. 173-80 (from last  break on p. 173), pp. 198-99 (1st  break on p. 198 to 1st  break on p. 199), and pp. 203-04 (from 1st  break on p. 203).

 

FCS pp. 247-74 (Ch. 9 on Ex parte Young).

 

Federal Income Tax

§204.1

Professor Winchester

Register for Federal Income Taxation on TWEN.  Follow the link for the “Worksheet Drop Box."  Click the button in the upper right hand corner labeled “Manage Anonymous ID's.”  Provide your Exam ID in the box labeled “Primary course ID.” 

Read the following portions of the Freeland et al. text: 

Pages 3-6, and 16-32 (omit the Mayo case).

Read the Class 1 Handout. It is available in TWEN under the tab for “Class Slides and Handouts.”

Familiarize yourself with the following provision of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

         IRC § 61(a)

 

Complete the Class 1 Worksheet, which can be found in the Worksheet Drop Box on TWEN.  Submit the Worksheet through the Worksheet Drop Box by 2:30 pm, August 17. 

 

Immigration Removal Defense Seminar
§547.1
Prof. Knowles

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Intellectual Property Research Project

§649.1

Professor Berholtz

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

International Business Transactions

§249.1

Professor Tiefenbrun

Think about your fantasy international business that you would like to set up and how you would go about doing it.

 

Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 in International Business Transactions: A Problem-Oriented Coursebook (Folsom), 11th Edition, West, and come to class ready to talk about your international business transaction.

 

International Law & the Humanities

§494.1

Professor Tiefenbrun

Read pp. 3-19 in Decoding International Law: Semiotics and the Humanities (Tiefenbrun), 2010. 

 

Make sure you have acquired all the literary texts for the course before you come to class on the first day. 

 

Make sure you have acquired or have access to view all of the movies (dvds) needed for this course.  These movies are available at the Library course reserve desk.  The movies that you will need to view are:

Week 2: Hotel Rwanda 

Week 3: The Pianist     

Week 8: Divorce Iranian Style and Two Women  (2 documentaries)

Week 12: Memoirs of a Geisha

Week 13. Flash of Genius

 

Welcome to the world of great books and great movies! Have fun reading beautiful books, thinking about big international law issues, and watching great movies. I want this to be a course you will never forget!

 

International Sports Law

§528.1

Professor Green

Read Chapter 1 and submit the Reading Reaction Paper the day before per the Syllabus

Introduction to Mediation

§423.1

Professors Rafner

First Assignment Questions (Due Class 1)

 

a.    Choose One Written Assignment from below:

 

Essay on Movie of Choice that deals in some way with mediation or conflict resolution (Possible Options: Crash, Don’t Mess with the Zohan, Shrek the 3rd, Freaky Friday, The Heffalump Movie (Winnie the Pooh), Bridge Over the River Kwai, 12 Angry Men, Gran Torino, My Sister’s Keeper, (Minimum 4 pages)

Or,

Choose One Story From the Book, Stories Mediators Tell and write a short essay pulling

out the essential message of the story for you and why you think the story is useful for

students of mediation. (Minimum 4 pages)

 

Introduction to Open Source Software

§518.1

Professor Kaufman

IMPORTANT NOTE:  There will be NO CLASS on August 18th.  This is the first week of class. 

FIRST WEEK ASSIGNMENT:  Due August 25th, which is the first week we will meet.

Please download the document Free Software, Free Society, Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman, Second Edition and read pages 3-13.     A PDF of this document may be found at the following link:  http://www.gnu.org/doc/fsfs-ii-2.pdf 

Students may contact Professor Kaufman at jkaufman@tjsl.edu or 858-368-9363 if they have any questions before the first class on August 25th. 

Judicial Externship

§399.1 & §400.1

Professor Tropp

Be sure you have completed and turned in your Fall 2015 Enrollment Form.

Lawyering Skills

All Sections

All Professors

  • Read Lindh v. Surman (in Reading Like a Lawyer and posted on TWEN)
  • Review McKinney, Chapter 10-12 & Schwartz, Chapter 15, pp. 149-158
  • Sign up for Lawyering Skills on TWEN

 

Legal Foundations

§533.1 & §533.2

Professor Bolus

Professor Samo

Instead of purchasing a book for Legal Foundation, students in Legal Foundations will need to pay a Materials fee of $90 to cover the cost of the BarBri AMP program, which is a required online resource for this course.  As indicated on the syllabus, students are required to complete the assigned online modules in accordance with the Schedule of Assignments.  Students enrolled in Legal Foundations should also add the Legal Foundations (Fall 2015) TWEN Page before the first class.

 

Students will complete a one-hour Multiple Choice Baseline Exam during the first class meeting. The Multiple Choice Baseline Exam will be comprised of thirty (30) questions and will cover Torts, Contracts, and Civil Procedure in a mixed-subject format. The Multiple Choice Baseline Exam will be closed-book and closed-note. The Multiple Choice Baseline Exam will be graded on a credit/no-credit basis. Students who complete the Multiple Choice Baseline Exam will receive credit. The instructors DO NOT have the authority to excuse students from the Multiple Choice Baseline Exam.

Legal Principles

§633.1

Professor TBA

Register for this course on TWEN.  Complete the Class 1 Reading Sheet (available on TWEN under the “Class One” folder) after you complete the reading.  Submit it before class via the TWEN Drop Box. Review your Defamation notes and outline and bring the information with you to class.

 

 

Read: chapters 1-3 in Open Book: Succeeding on Exams from the First Day of Law School (Friedman), 2011, Aspen Publishing.

 

Read pp. 106-114 in Mastering the Law School Exam (Darrow-Kleinhaus), 2006, Thomson West.

Bring your negligence outline and notes with you to class.

 

Legal Synthesis I

All sections

Various Professors

Study the Contracts PowerPoint found on TWEN.

 

Legal Synthesis II

All Sections

All Professors

Study the Federal Civil Procedure PowerPoint found on TWEN.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.1 & §099.5

Professor Day

No initial assignment.

Legal Writing I
§099.2 & §099.6

Professor Durst

Read chapter 1 and prepare exercise 1B for class discussion in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.3

Professor Rierson

Read pp. 3-9 (Rules and Policies), 11-22 (Sources of Law), 43-53 (Precedent and Stare Decisis) and complete exercises 2-A, 2-B, 4-A, 4-B, and 4-C in chapters 2 and 4 for review in class in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 9-19 (The US Legal System) in Just Research: Preparing for Practice (Enquist), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.4

Professor Christensen

Read chapters 1-3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.7

Professor Slattery

Reading and Assignments for Class 1

 

Welcome to Legal Writing I.  In preparation for our first class, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A, B, C, D, and E, below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (we are section 99.7, and you’ll see my name next to the course title), and be sure to use the assignment sheet posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignments described in item C, below.  Note also that the assignments and responses to questions listed under C and D, below, are due by 3:00pm on the day of our first class (so I can review them and prepare accordingly).

(A) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end).

(B) Read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook.

(C) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type your answers directly into the assignment sheet posted in the Class 1 assignment dropbox on TWEN, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; I use these assignments to assess your ability to follow directions, assess your current reasoning skills, and to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(D) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(E) Point your web browser to http://www.questionpress.com/slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer the warmup and questionnaire questions you’ll find posted there.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.8

Professor Wildenthal

Class 1 (week of Aug 17):

Dernbach pp. 3-22 & 43-50

Kunz pp. 5 & 131-42

 

Class 2 (week of Aug 17):

Dernbach pp 23-42 (some additional assignments announced later)

 

Legal Writing II

All Sections

All Professors

Read chapters 2 thru 4 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.1

Professor Cromer Young

Register for this course on TWEN.

 

Read pp. 1-12 and 17-78 in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013, Aspen.

 

All students must bring both the text and the course supplement to the first day of class along with one blank spiral-bound notebook and pens.

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.2

Professor Schwabach

No Initial Assignment

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.3

Professor Simon

(1) Read Syllabus (to be posted on TWEN)

(2) Read pp. 1-12, 17-18 (Introduction) in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013.

 

Moot Court

§355.1

Professor Semeraro

No Initial Assignment

Patent Clinic Seminar

§572.1

Professor Afshar

1. Read the SBLC Certified Law Student Handbook (Posted on the Docket)

 

2. Read California Rules of Professional Conduct §§3-100, 3-110 & 3-500

 

3. Review Patent Process - http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process/index.jsp

AND

Patent FAQs - http://www.uspto.gov/faq/patents.jsp

 

4. Read: US patent No. 7707933, and Outline different sections of the patent

 

 

 

Pre Bar Fundamentals

§646.2

Professor Matsumoto

Please complete and bring to the first day of class a HARD COPY of the Pre-Class Questionnaire located in the course materials for this course on the Docket. 

Professional Responsibility

§140.1

Professor Berenson

Read pp. 1-38 in Legal Ethics in the Practice of Law (Zitrin), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read the Preamble to the ABA Model Rules of Professional Responsibility (2002).  The Preamble is the first 13 paragraphs of the Model Rules, and starts on page 3 of Legal Ethics: Rules, Statutes and Comparisons (Zitrin), 2014, LexisNexis.

 

Professional Responsibility

§140.2

Professor Kaye

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

 

 

Property I

§141.1

Professor Semeraro

Register for this course on TWEN.

The first assignment is posted there and on the Docket.

Property I

§141.2

Professor Simon

(1) Read Syllabus (to be posted on TWEN)

(2) Read pp. 1, 18-33 (through note 4) (Acquisition by Capture) in Property (Dukeminier), 8th Edition, 2014.

 

Property II

§142.1

Professor Schwabach

 

Read pp. 441-81 in text; brief Garner v. Gerrish, Hannan v. Dusch, Ernst v. Conditt, and Kendall v. Ernest Pestana, Inc.  

Be prepared to discuss Hypothetical Problem 1 from the Workbook and, from the text, page 444, problems 1 & 2; page 447, problems 2 & 3; page 465, problems 1 & 2; pages 471-72, problem 3; and pages 480-81, problems 1-3.

 

Property II

§142.2

Professor Wright

 

1. August 17:  Textbook, pages 292-304

 

2. August 19: Textbook, pages 304-317.

 

Remedies

§166.1

Professor Waldman

 

Register for this course on TWEN and read p. 2 in the Remedies text only available on TWEN.

 

Read pp. 91-94 in Weaver and Kelly's Black Letter Outline On Remedies (Weaver), 2005, Thomson West.

Cali Exercises: Compensatory Damages: Terminologies and Basic Concepts (don’t worry much about ambiguities associated with Actual Damages or Pecuniary vs. Non-Pecuniary Damages).

Remedies

§166.2

Professor Wezelman

Read pp. 1-41and 49-53 in Remedies (Rendleman), 8th Edition.

 

Read pp. 1-2 of the Class 1 Handout posted in the “Course Materials” section for this course on the Docket. 

Scholarly Legal Writing

§418.1

Professor Deo

Introduction – The Nature of the Law Review Note

  • Read F&F pages 1-9 and 12-22.  
  • We will spend the meeting discussing the course in general, especially the nature of the scholarly enterprise you are about to undertake. 
  • We will also introduce ourselves to one another, to get comfortable working as a team to produce excellent scholarship!

Scholarly Legal Writing

§418.2

Professor Winchester

  • Read pages 1-9 of the textbook.
  • Complete the following exercise: Choose an actual student note from a law journal and read it prior to class. (It may help you to pick an article in the subject area you are thinking about for your own Note.) Write up a very concise analysis of the article (up to one page), restating the author’s thesis, categorizing the article within Professor Delgado’s framework described on pages 6 and 7 of the textbook, and offering (with an explanation) at least one criticism of the article, and at least one strength of the article. 

 

Small Business Clinic Seminar

§523.1

Professor Nieman

No Initial Assignment

Solo Practice Concentration

§600.1

Professor McCoy

Read the Introduction and Chapter 1 of Flying Solo.

Sports Law

§246.1

Professor Grossman

Read chapter 1 in Sports Law: Cases and Materials (Jarvis), 1999, Thomson West.

Torts I
§111.2 & §111.3

Professor Bisom-Rapp

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read pp. 1-4 (Introduction), 17-20 (Concept of Intent), notes 22-24 (do not read Spivey), and 24-28 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 3-4 (1.01A-C) and 5-6 (1.01 E-F) in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Please note that in order to save my students money on books, I am using the 2010 editions of the required books for this course rather than more recently published editions, which are more expensive.  These books will be used again in Torts II during spring 2016. Please purchase the 2010 editions as the pages are different in the more recent editions. You may need to shop around for the best price of these 2010 editions.  There are used options that may save you a great deal of money.

 

Torts I
§111.1 & §111.4

Professor Dyson

Read Battery (beginning with Wallace v. Rosen) p. 31-37, & Assault, p. 37-41 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.
 

Read pp. 3-4 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Optional bur recommended: Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault, in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen (Optional, but recommended).

 

PLEASE NOTE: the professor is allowing the use of the older 4th edition in an attempt to save you money but the newer 5th edition is acceptable if you are unable to find the 4th edition. You may need to shop around for the best price of these 2010 editions.  There are used options that may save you a great deal of money.

 

Torts II

§112.1

Professor Delman

Read pp. 713-719 (Strict Liability), 719-726 (Rylands v. Fletcher), 726-728 (Miller v. Civil Construction), 737-739 (Foster v. Preston Mill), 739-741 (Golden v. Amory), and 741-744 (Sandy v. Bushey) in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts: Cases and Materials (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Read pp. 321-341 in Glannon on Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 247-263 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

Trademark Clinic

§574.1

Professor TBA

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Trial Practice

§170.1

Professor Siegel

Read Dixon v. Providential Life Insurance Company (Stien), 2000, NITA. 

 

Read chapters 1 and 2 in Trial Advocacy (Bergman), 3rd Edition, Thomson West.

 

Complete problem 3.9 in appendix C of the syllabus and posted in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket for this course.  Prepare case analysis for the defense in problem 3.9.  Develop suggested themes and theories for each side.

Trial Practice

§170.2 & §170.3

Professor Grossman

Read Chapters 1-3 in The Dynamics of Trial Practice: Problems and Materials (Carlson), 4th Edition, Thomson West and prepare a Case Evaluation Memorandum, as outlined in § 3.6, page 54 of the text. For this assignment only, you will represent the party, based upon the first initial of your last name:

 

A-G Prosecution, criminal case

H-M Defense, criminal case

N-R Plaintiff, civil case

S-Z Defense, civil case

Trial Practice

§170.4

Professor Begovich

Please read pages 1-65 in Potter V. Shrackle and prepare an outline of questions for a direct & cross-examination of witness Marilyn Kelly.

 

Veterans Legal Assistance Clinic

§429.1

Professor Berenson

Register for this course on TWEN and read the Clinic Primer.

 

Read chapters 1-3 in Clinical Legal Education: A Textbook for Law School Clinical Programs (Chavkin), 2002.

Wills & Trusts

§171.1

Professor Wenger

Please read pages 1-34 in Dukeminier.

Wills & Trusts

§171.2

Professor Martindill

Introduction and Class 1 of Wills and Trusts Course Outline.( To be Posted to class Docket)

 

California Probate Code  Read Sections 6400 and 6401(a)(b).  Purchase of a hard copy of the California Probate Code is not required.  Students must have access to the Probate Code and read the assigned Sections prior to class.

Know the following introductory definitions:

A) Will or Testament- a document that is a lawful, voluntary disposition of assets upon death
B) Codicil-a written supplement or amendment to a Will
C) Testator/trix (Transferor) - one who makes a Will
D) Devise-gift of real property
E) Bequest-gift of personal property
F) Legacy-gift of money
G) Heir/Heir-at-law - those persons designated by statute as being next in line to inherit
H) Beneficiary (Transferee)-those persons named in the Will to inherit
I) Issue- lineal descendants of decedent
J) Probate, Surrogate, Orphan’s Court-Court having jurisdiction to hear matters arising from decedent’s estates or trusts

K) Testate-Decedent dies leaving a valid Will which directs disposition of estate

L) Intestate-Decedent dies without a Will and estate is distributed according to state law

M) Decedent-Person who died and whose estate distribution is in question