Initial Assignments

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Students are responsible for preparing accordingly.

 

 

 

FALL 2014 INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS

 

 

Course

Assignment

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure

Professor Kaye

§261.1

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

ADR Competition

§425.1

Professor Waldman

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Criminal Law - Vice Law

Professor Kaye

§470.1

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Legal Research

§297.1

Professor Templo

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Legal Research

Professor Inman

§297.2

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Mediation

§419.1

Professor Waldman

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Property Seminar

Professor Markey

§405.1

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Advanced Trial Advocacy

Professor Siegel

§291.1

Read Chapter 1, pp. 7-42 in The Art and Science of Trial Advocacy (Perrin), 2nd Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Know the facts of State v. Alexander found in Rose’s  Evidence  in Context: Evidentiary Problems and Exercises (Rose), 2010, West.  Be ready to discuss Brandi Alexander and how to prepare for her testimony at trial on direct and for cross. 

                                               

Be ready to discuss Dr. Jones and how to prepare for his testimony at trial on direct and for cross.

 

ALL SHOULD BE PREPARED TO PLAY WITNESS AND COUNSEL FOR THE ASSIGNMENT.

American Legal History

Professor Vandevelde

§217.1

Register for the course on TWEN.  Under course materials on the TWEN site, find Assignment #1 and read three documents: the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the excerpt from John Locke's Treatise on Civil Government. 

 

Read pages 7-10 in The Magic Mirror: Law in American History (Hall), 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.

Business Associations

§115.1

Professor Wenger

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Business Associations

§115.2

Professor Winchester

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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California Civil Procedure

§202.1

Professor S. Slomanson

Read pp. 1-36 (not Schmier case, but read case notes 2-3/not Vidrio case), 39.2 (Stern case), 44 case notes & notes 1,3, and 5, and notes on Aggregation & Equitable Relief in Cases and Materials on California Civil Procedure (Levine), 4th Edition, West.

California Evidence

§225.1

Professor Atkins

Read pp. 1-34 in California Evidence: Examples & Explanations (Goodman), 2011, Aspen.

 

Before the first class, read through the California Evidence Code. This will provide you with a good foundation and overview for the upcoming classroom sessions.

Civil Procedure I
§103.1 & §103.2

Professor Deo

Read Introduction: Freer 1-10, 15-18; Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (FRCP) 1.

 

Read Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Federal Question: Freer 177-180, 214-218 n.1, 222-230; 28 U.S.C. 1331, 1338; U.S. Constitution Art. III, Sec. 2.

Civil Procedure I
§103.3

Professor Rierson

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Civil Procedure I
§103.4

Professor Slomanson

Visit and become familiar with the course web page at http://www.tjsl.edu/slomansonb/FED_CP1_e-book.html.

Civil Procedure II
§104.1

Professor Cromer Young

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Civil Procedure II
§104.2

Professor Cromer Young

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Civil Procedure II
§104.3

Professor Wildenthal

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Civil Rights & Civil Liberties: Law & Practice

§609.1

Professors Yoo

Read Monroe v. Pape, 365 U.S. 167 (1961) and Martinez-Rodriguez v. Colon-Pizarro, 54 F.3d 980 (1st Cir. 1995).

 

You will need to turn in a one-page paper on the first day of class on a Constitutional violation you personally experienced or observed. 

Clinical Education Seminars

§398.1 & §399.1

Professor Tropp

Be sure you have completed and turned in your fall 2014 Enrollment Form.

Community Property

§167.1

Professor Klueck

Read pp. 53-96,  in Community Property in California (Blumberg), 6th Edition, Aspen

 

Be prepared to answer the question: What do the deliberations of the California Constitutional Convention (p. 55-58) say about the role and legal status of women in mid-nineteenth century California/America?

Comparative Criminal Procedure Through Film

§647.1

Professor Bettwy

Register for this course on TWEN to access ALL readings including the Professor’s A Survey of Comparative Criminal Procedure through Foreign Films course materials.

 

Register account on Amazon.com to view assigned films.

 

Read pp. 1-22 and the film summaries for the assigned films on pp. 332 and 416 in A Survey of Comparative Criminal Procedure through Foreign Films located on the TWEN site for this course.

 

View the films Witness for the Prosecution (U.K.) (Netflix) (Amazon $2.99) (iTunes $2.99) and I Confess (Canada) (Amazon $2.00) (iTunes $2.99)

 

Also review these materials to consider practical applications of comparative criminal procedure (links through syllabus on TWEN): Proving foreign law (Calif. Evid. Code §§ 310, 311, 452, 454; Fed. R. Civ. P. 44.1; Fed. R. Crim. P. 26.1), Use of prior foreign convictions (Calif. Penal Code § 668), and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act "local law" defense (15 U.S.C. 78dd-1(c)(1))

 

Constitutional Law I

§135.1

Professor Herald

Register for the course on TWEN and review the course content and syllabus.

Skim pp. 3-16, read pp. 16-26, and pp. 26-33 (Marbury v. Madison) in Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition, Foundation Press.

Optional: Read pp. 37-45 (Treatise) in Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies (Chemerinsky), 4th Edition, Aspen.

If you don’t already have one, you must purchase a Response Card Keypad (clicker) and bring your keypad to the first day of class.  Used keypads may be sold or purchased on the student’s Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds.  New keypads can be purchased by logging onto http://store.turningtechnologies.com using the school code "g8Rd" (case sensitive) to receive the TJSL discounted price.  Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option; you must have a keypad for this class.  One keypad will work for multiple classes.  New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

Constitutional Law I

§135.2

Professor Wildenthal

There is no required textbook in this course. The primary course readings are cases in the public domain which Prof. Wildenthal will make available to you in PDF format (or you may obtain them yourself online). Some additional readings will also be assigned and made available (free of charge).

If you are enrolled in the course, feel free to email Prof. Wildenthal ​ (bryanw@tjsl.edu)​ and he can send you any assigned cases and readings.

 

Monday, August 18 (Class 1):

 

Judicial review.

 

U.S. Const. Art. III, § 1, § 2, cls. 1-2; Art. VI, cls. 2-3; and excerpts of Judiciary Act of 1789 (handout provided).

 

Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803): read Chief Justice Marshall’s opinion of the Court, pp. 153-80.

 

Wednesday, August 20 (Class 2):

 

Nonjusticiable “political questions.”

 

U.S. Const. Art. I, § 2, cl. 5, § 3, cls. 6-7, and § 8, cls. 3-4; Art. II, § 1, cl. 1, and § 3.

 

Nixon v. United States, 506 U.S. 224 (1993): read Chief Justice Rehnquist’s opinion of the Court and the concurrences of Justices Stevens, White, and Souter, pp. 226-54.

 

Zivotofsky v. Clinton, 566 U.S. ___ [132 S. Ct. 1421] (2012) (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/11pdf/10-699.pdf): read Chief Justice Roberts’s opinion of the Court, pp. 1-12, and Justice Breyer’s dissent, pp. 1-9

 

Monday, August 25 (Class 3):

 

The Second Amendment, gun rights, and gun control: a case study in text, history, and modern interpretations and applications of constitutional rights.

 

U.S. Const. Amdt. II; see also Art. I, § 8, cls. 15-16; Art. II, § 2, cl. 1 (the Militia Clauses).

 

District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008): read Justice Scalia’s opinion of the Court (include fns. 1, 3-6, 14, and 16-27; omit others), pp. 573-636, parts of Justice Stevens’s dissent (include fns. 2, 3, 14, 28, and 39; omit others), pp. 636-52 (through Part I), p. 662 (1st ¶ of Part III), pp. 666-71 (“Postenactment Commentary” and “Post-Civil War Legislative History”), and pp. 679-80 (Part V), and parts of Justice Breyer’s dissent, pp. 681-82 (through Part I) and pp. 719-23 (Parts V-VI).

  

Wednesday, August 27 (Class 4):

 

The Second and Fourteenth Amendments: enforcing (“incorporating”) the Bill of Rights against the states, the Fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clause, the Privileges and Immunities Clauses of Article IV and the Fourteenth Amendment, and more arguments over text, history, and modern interpretations and applications of constitutional rights.

 

U.S. Const. Art. IV, § 2, cl. 1; Amdt. XIV, § 1.

 

McDonald v. Chicago (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/09pdf/08-1521.pdf), 561 U.S. ___ [130 S. Ct. 3020] (2010): read Justice Alito’s opinion of the Court and plurality opinion (include fns. 5-6, 9-14, 17-18, 20-28, and 30; omit others), pp. 1-45 (Parts II.C, IV, and V of Justice Alito’s opinion were joined only by Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Scalia and Kennedy), Justice Scalia’s concurrence, pp. 1-15, Justice Thomas’s concurrence (include fns. 6-12, 14-15, and 19-23; omit others), pp. 1-56, parts of Justice Stevens’s dissent (include fns. 1, 5-8, 11, 13-17, and 19-25; omit others), pp. 1-27 (through Part III) and pp. 51-57 (Parts VI-VII), and parts of Justice Breyer’s dissent, pp. 1-2 (before Part I) and pp. 18-21 (last ¶ of Part II and Part III before “The Eighteenth Century”).

 

McDonald v. Chicago (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/09pdf/08-1521.pdf), 561 U.S. ___ [130 S. Ct. 3020] (2010): read Justice Alito’s opinion of the Court and plurality opinion (include fns. 5-6, 9-14, 17-18, 20-28, and 30; omit others), pp. 1-45 (Parts II.C, IV, and V of Justice Alito’s opinion were joined only by Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Scalia and Kennedy), Justice Scalia’s concurrence, pp. 1-15, Justice Thomas’s concurrence (include fns. 6-12, 14-15, and 19-23; omit others), pp. 1-56, parts of Justice Stevens’s dissent (include fns. 1, 5-8, 11, 13-17, and 19-25; omit others), pp. 1-27 (through Part III) and pp. 51-57 (Parts VI-VII), and parts of Justice Breyer’s dissent, pp. 1-2 (before Part I) and pp. 18-21 (last ¶ of Part II and Part III before “The Eighteenth Century”).

 

Constitutional Law I

§135.3

Professor Vandevelde

Register for the course on TWEN. 

 

Skim the U.S. Constitution, which begins on page 3, for the purpose of identifying the subjects covered by the Constitution and how the document is organized and read Marbury v. Madison, which begins on page 26 of Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition, Foundation Press.

Constitutional Law II

§136.1

Professor Guzelian

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Contracts Drafting

§465.1

Professor Casalins

Read chapters 1-5 in Drafting Contracts: How and Why Lawyers Do What They Do (Stark), 2007, Aspen.

Contracts I
§101.1

Professor Templin

The initial assignment for this course will be made available and provided to you as a pdf by the professor on August 13, 2014 – the Wednesday before classes start.

 

Contracts I
§101.2

Professor Lee

Read pp. 1-17 and complete problem 1-1 in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

Contracts I
§101.3

Professor Greene

Read Ray v. Eurice Brothers, p. 33, in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read restatement sections 17 and 22 in Rules of Contract Law 2012-2013 Statutory Supplement (Knapp), 2012, Aspen.

Contracts II

§102.2

Professor Templin

The initial assignment for this course will be made available and provided to you as a pdf by the professor on August 13, 2014 – the Wednesday before classes start.

 

Copyright Law

§313.1

Professor Cromer Young

Read Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 through the problem on page 25 in Yen and Liu’s Copyright Law, Essential Cases and Materials (Yen), 2nd Edition, Thomson West.

Criminal Law
§105.1

Professor Keller

Register for this course on TWEN.

 

As background information for the course:

  • Read pp. 1-19 (stop at “The Presentation of Evidence”) in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen.
  • Read §§3.01 to 3.03 in Understanding Criminal Law (Dressler), 6th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Be prepared to discuss:

  • Pp. 31-36 (“Proof Beyond Reasonable Doubt” through note 4) in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen.

 

Readings on Theories of Punishment, in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen:

 

  • Introduction, pp. 75-82, Why Punish? Introductory Note, at 89-91
  • Utilitarian View, pp. 91-93,
  • Retribution, pp. 93-100 (through Note on Retribution as Constraint)
  • Deterrence, pp. 111-114
  • Rehabilitation, Vitiello and Moore pp. 115-116 and Note – Does Rehabilitation Work?, at pp.117-118
  • Incapacitation, pp. 120-124

 

Prepare your answers for the Worksheet on Theories of Punishment – see TWEN coursepage under Syllabus/Schedule of Assignments.

Criminal Law
§105.2

Professor Steinberg

Read pp. 32-48 (Principles of Punishment) and pp. 49-50 (Queen v. Dudley and Stephens) in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 11-23 in Understanding Criminal Law (Dressler), 6th Edition, LexisNexis.

Criminal Procedure

§106.1 & §106.2

Professor Kreit

Read pp. 1-24 and 27 in Criminal Procedure: Investigation (Chemerinsky), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

Critical Race Theory

§373.1

Professor Wenger

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Entertainment Law Transactions

§336.1

Professor Novak

No Initial Assignment

Evidence

§138.1

Professor Cohn

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Evidence

§138.2

Professor Christensen

Read chapters 1 thru 4 in Learning Evidence: From the Federal Rules to the Courtroom (Merritt), 2nd Edition, Thomson West.

 

Federal Criminal Practice

§648.1

Professors Arendsen

No Initial Assignment

Federal Income Tax

§204.1

Professor Winchester

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Intellectual Property Research Project

§649.1

Professor Berholtz

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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International Business Transactions

§249.1

Professor Tiefenbrun

Think about your fantasy international business that you would like to set up and how you would go about doing it.

 

Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 in International Business Transactions: A Problem-Oriented Coursebook (Folsom), 11th Edition, West, and come to class ready to talk about your international business transaction.

 

International Human Rights

§255.1

Professor Cohn

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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International Investment Law & Arbitration

§472.1

Professor Vandevelde

Register for the course on TWEN.

 

Read pp. 1-11 in the textbook.  You can find the information on ordering the textbook on the TWEN site for this course.

International Law & the Humanities

§494.1

Professor Tiefenbrun

Read pp. 3-19 in Decoding International Law: Semiotics and the Humanities (Tiefenbrun), 2010. 

 

Make sure you have acquired all the literary texts for the course before you come to class on the first day. 

 

Make sure you have acquired or have access to view all of the movies (dvds) needed for this course.  These movies are available at the Library course reserve desk.  The movies that you will need to view are:

 

  Week 2: Hotel Rwanda 

  Week 3: The Pianist     

  Week 8: Divorce Iranian Style and Two Women  (2 documentaries)

  Week 12: Memoirs of a Geisha

  Week 13. Flash of Genius

 

International Sports Law

§528.1

Professor Green

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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International Trade WTO

§394.1

Professor Wright

Read pp. 1-30 in The Law and Policy of the WTO: Text, Cases, and Materials (Van den Bossche), 3rd Edition, Cambridge University Press.

Introduction to Mediation

§423.1 & §423.3

Professors Cobalt

Read the “Mediation Concepts” section in The Art and Practice of Mediation, Introductory Course (NCRC), 2013, National Conflict Resolution Center.

 

Write a thoughtful written response to the following questions:

 

  1. Describe a conflict in which you have been involved.  What was the cause of the conflict?
  2. What role, if any, did you play in the conflict?  How were you impacted by the conflict?
  3. If the conflict was resolved, how did it get resolved?  What was helpful in getting it resolved?
  4. If it wasn’t resolved, what would you have wanted from the other person?  What do you think the other person wanted from you?
  5. Why did you go to law school?  How has your law school experience met (or not met) your expectations for attending?

Introduction to Mediation

§423.2

Professor Morris & Brown

Read pp. 1-54 in The Mediator’s Handbook (Beer), 4th Edition.

 

Watch and come to class prepared to discuss the 2004 movie Crash (Sandra Bullock & Don Cheadle).

Introduction to Mediation

§423.4

Professor Morris & Waldman

Read pp. 1-54 in The Mediator’s Handbook (Beer), 4th Edition, New Society Publishers.

 

Watch the 2009 movie, Up in the Air (George Clooney & Vera Farmiga) and come to class prepared to discuss the movie.

Judicial Externship

§399.1 & §400.1

Professor Tropp

Be sure you have completed and turned in your fall 2014 Enrollment Form.

Law & Religion

§412.1

Professor Steinberg

Read pp. 30-35 (The American Constitutional Experiment) in Religion and the Constitution (McConnell), 3rd Edition, Aspen.

 

Read David E. Steinberg, The Myth of Church-State Separation, 39 Clev. St. L. Rev. 623 (2011).

Lawyering Skills

All Sections

All Professors

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation) and review your lesson plan.

 

Read Lindh v. Surman and review Chapters 10-12 in Reading Like a Lawyer (McKinney), 2nd Edition, Carolina Academic Press.

 

Review Chapter 15 and pp. 149-158, in Expert Learning for Law Students (Schwartz), 2008, Carolina Academic Press.

Legal Foundations

§533.1 & §533.2

Professor Neal

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Principles

§633.1

Professor Bolus

Sign up for this course on TWEN and complete the Class 1 Reading Sheet (available on TWEN) after you complete the reading below.  Submit it before class via the TWEN Drop Box.  Review your negligence notes and outline and bring the information with you to class.

 

Read chapters 1-3 in Open Book: Succeeding on Exams from the First Day of Law School (Friedman), 2011, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 106-114 in Mastering the Law School Exam (Darrow-Kleinhaus), 2006, Thomson West.
 

Legal Synthesis I

All sections

Various Professors

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis II

All Sections

All Professors

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing I
§099.1 & §099.4

Professor Day

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read pp. 3-22 and 43-50 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 5 and 131 – 142 in The Process of Legal Research (Kunz), 8th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.2 & §099.5

Professor Durst

Read chapter 1 and prepare exercise 1B for class discussion in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.3

Professor Rierson

Read pp. 3-9 (Rules and Policies), 11-22 (Sources of Law), 43-53 (Precedent and Stare Decisis) and complete the exercises in chapters 2 and 4 for review in class in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 9-19 (The US Legal System) in Just Research: Preparing for Practice (Enquist), 4th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.6

Professor Slattery

For the first class session, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A-E below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title) as you will use the template answer form posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignment described in item C below.  You will learn how to use TWEN during your orientation.  Note also that your first assignment is due by 11:59pm on the night before our first class.

 (a) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end);

(b) read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook;

(c) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type (or word process) your answers, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; in addition to your reasoning skills and ability to spot and follow directions, I use these assignments to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please also spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(d) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(e) Point your web browser to www.questionpress.com/prof_slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer both the reflective prompt and questionnaire you’ll find posted there.

Legal Writing I
§099.7 & §099.8

Professor Wright

Read pp. 3-40 (through Exercise 3-A) and complete exercises 1-B and 3-A in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 1-14 and 217 – end in the Legal Writing I Workbook (TJSL), 2014, Available from Legal Books Distributing.

 

Draft a relatively short biography (approximately 2 pages).   

 

Please bring 2 copies of the Dernbach Exercises 1-B and 3-A and one copy of your biography to the first day of class.  At the beginning of class you'll turn in your biography and one copy of your Dernbach Exercises. 

Legal Writing II

All Sections

All Professors

Read chapters 2 thru 4 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.1

Professor Schwabach

No Initial Assignment

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.2

Professor Cromer Young

Register for this course on TWEN.

 

Read pp. 1-12 and 17-78 in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013, Aspen.

 

All students must bring both the text and the course supplement to the first day of class along with one blank spiral-bound notebook and pens.

Mastering the Performance Test

§644.3

Professor Lee

Read pp. 1-5 (Introduction) in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013, Aspen.

Moot Court

§355.1

Professor Semeraro

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Music Law

§408.1

Professor Greene

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Patent Clinic Seminar

§572.1

Professor Afshar

Read US Patent 7,707,933 and outline the different sections of the patent.

 

Review Patent Process - http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process/index.jsp

 

Read: Patent FAQS – http://www.uspto.gov/faq/patents.jsp

 

Read the California Rules of Professional Conduct §§3-100, 3-110 & 3-500.

 

Find Power of Attorney/Change of Correspondence Forms (from the USPTO ) and Bring to Class.

Patent Law

§414.1

Professor Simon

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Peer Mediation

§539.1

Professor Brown

Read pp. 3-9, 29-38, and 238-243 in Students Resolving Conflict: Peer Mediation in Schools (Cohen), 2nd Edition, Good Year Books

Professional Responsibility

§140.1

Professor Berenson

Read pp. 1-38 in Legal Ethics in the Practice of Law (Zitrin), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read the Preamble to the ABA Model Rules of Professional Responsibility (2002).  The Preamble is the first 13 paragraphs of the Model Rules, and starts on page 3 of Legal Ethics: Rules, Statutes and Comparisons (Zitrin), 2014, LexisNexis.

Professional Responsibility

§140.2

Professor Schwabach

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Property I

§141.1

Professor Markey

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Property I

§141.2

Professor Simon

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Property I

§141.3

Professor Semeraro

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Remedies

§166.1

Professor Waldman

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Remedies

§166.2

Professor Golden

Not Yet Received from the Professor

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Remedies

§166.3

Professor Wezelman

Read pp. 1-41and 49-53 in Remedies (Rendleman), 8th Edition.

 

Read pp. 1-2 of the Class 1 Handout posted in the “Course Materials” section for this course on the Docket. 

Scholarly Legal Writing

§418.1

Professor Herald

Register for this course on TWEN.

Scholarly Legal Writing

§418.2

Professor Dyson

Read pp. 1-9 (ch. 1.A-1.B.1), 12-13 (ch. 1.C), and 14-26 (ch. 2 through 2.B) in Scholarly Legal Writing for Law Students (Fajans), 4th Edition, Thomson West.

 

Read Eugene Volokh, Test Suites: A Tool For Improving Student Articles, 52 J. Legal Ed. 440 (2002).

 

Email me your Topic Proposal when you submit it to Law Review.

Small Business Clinic Seminar

§523.1

Professor Nieman

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Solo Practice Concentration

§600.1

Professor McCoy

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Sports Law

§246.1

Professor Grossman

Read chapter 1 in Sports Law: Cases and Materials (Jarvis), 1999, Thomson West.

Torts I
§111.2 & §111.3

Professor Bisom-Rapp

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation) and read pp. 1-10 in the Torts I Supplemental Materials posted on the site.

 

Read pp. 1-4 (Introduction), 17-20 (Concept of Intent), notes 22-24 (do not read Spivey), and 24-28 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 3-4 (1.01A-C) and 5-6 (1.01 E-F) in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

Torts I
§111.1 & §111.4

Professor Dyson

Read Battery (beginning with Wallace v. Rosen) p. 31-37, & Assault, p. 37-41 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.
 

Read pp. 3-4 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault, in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen (Optional, but recommended).

Torts II

§112.1 & §112.2

Professor Delman

Read pp. 713-719 (Strict Liability), 719-726 (Rylands v. Fletcher), 726-728 (Miller v. Civil Construction), 737-739 (Foster v. Preston Mill), 739-741 (Golden v. Amory), and 741-744 (Sandy v. Bushey) in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts: Cases and Materials (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Read pp. 321-341 in Glannon on Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 247-263 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 5th Edition, LexisNexis.

Trademark Clinic

§574.1

Professor Lane

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Trial Practice

§170.1

Professor Siegel

Read Dixon v. Providential Life Insurance Company (Stien), 2000, NITA. 

 

Read chapters 1 and 2 in Trial Advocacy (Bergman), 3rd Edition, Thomson West.

 

Complete problem 3.9 in appendix C of the syllabus and posted in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket for this course.  Prepare case analysis for the defense in problem 3.9.  Develop suggested themes and theories for each side.

Trial Practice

§170.2 & §170.3

Professor Grossman

Read Chapters 1-3 in The Dynamics of Trial Practice: Problems and Materials (Carlson), 4th Edition, Thomson West and prepare a Case Evaluation Memorandum, as outlined in § 3.6, page 54 of the text. For this assignment only, you will represent the party, based upon the first initial of your last name:

 

A-G Prosecution, criminal case

H-M Defense, criminal case

N-R Plaintiff, civil case

S-Z Defense, civil case

Trial Practice

§170.4

Professor Begovich

Read pp. 1-50 in Fulbright v. Americraft Industries & Parker (Stein), 3rd Edition, NITA, and prepare an outline of direct and cross-examination questions for witness William Brown.

Trial Practice

§170.5

Professor Field-Barnard

Read chapters 1 and 2 (pages 51-55 only) in Trial Process: Law Tactics & Ethics (Tanford), 4th Edition.

 

Skim Hunter and Kesler case files found in Trial Practice Problems and Case Files (Tanford), 4th Edition.

Veterans Legal Assistance Clinic

§429.1

Professor Berenson

Register for this course on TWEN and read the Clinic Primer.

 

Read chapters 1-3 in Clinical Legal Education: A Textbook for Law School Clinical Programs (Chavkin), 2002.

Wills & Trusts

§171.1

Professor Wenger

Not Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Wills & Trusts

§171.2

Professor Martindill

Read the Introduction and Class 1 of Wills and Trusts Course Outline to be posted in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket for this course on the Docket following the end of the Summer semester. 

Read Probate Codes 6400 and 6401(a) (b).

Know the following introductory definitions:

A) Will or Testament- a document that is a lawful, voluntary disposition of assets upon death
B) Codicil-a written supplement or amendment to a Will
C) Testator/trix (Transferor) - one who makes a Will
D) Devise-gift of real property
E) Bequest-gift of personal property
F) Legacy-gift of money
G) Heir/Heir-at-law - those persons designated by statute as being next in line to inherit
H) Beneficiary (Transferee)-those persons named in the Will to inherit
I) Issue- lineal descendants of decedent
J) Probate, Surrogate, Orphan’s Court-Court having jurisdiction to hear matters arising from decedent’s estates or trusts

K) Testate-Decedent dies leaving a valid Will which directs disposition of estate

L) Intestate-Decedent dies without a Will and estate is distributed according to state law

M) Decedent-Person who died and whose estate distribution is in question