Initial Assignments

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LISTED BELOW ARE THE INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR UPCOMING SEMESTERS.  AS YOU CONTINUE TO SCROLL DOWN YOU WILL FIND ASSIGNMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMESTERS:

  • Spring 2015 Entering Students
  • Spring 2015 Full List

 

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                       INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR THE SPRING 2015 ENTERING STUDENTS 

 

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Please review your schedule and complete the assignments for your assigned classes.

 

Course

Assignment

Civil Procedure I

§103.1

Prof. Cromer Young

 

 

Sign up for this course on TWEN.

 

Sign up for this course on chartacourse.com

 

Civil Procedure I

§103.2

Prof. Slomanson

 

 

Navigate Course Website at <http://www.tjsl.edu/slomansonb/FED_CP1_e-book.html> & Watch Video on “Videos” (Course Website, click Videos).

 

Contracts I

§101.1

Prof. Golden

 

 

Read the short week 1 course introduction Handout that can be found in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket (www.tjsl.edu/document-library) for this course.  You will receive instructions on how to access the docket during your week 1 orientation.  This short course introduction should be read first.

 

Read pp. 31-48 (Ch.1, §3(A)) in Contracts: Cases and Materials (Farnsworth), 8th Edition.

 

Read Restatement 2nd of Contracts: §§1, 71-74, 79, 81and Uniform Commercial Code: pp. 263-264 (“Compiler’s Note”), §§1-103, 1-201(b)(3) & (12), 1-304, 2-102, 2-103(1); 2-105(1) and 2-106 in the required supplement, Selections for Contracts (Farnsworth), 2013.

 

NOTE: Readings from the Restatement 2nd of Contracts and Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) are in the required supplement, Selections for Contracts.  The 2013 edition of this supplement contains two versions of Article 1 of the UCC.  For purposes of this initial assignment all readings from Article 1 are from the "2001" version (pp. 265-282).

 

Contracts I

§101.2

Prof. Greene

 

 

Read Ray v. Eurice Brothers, p. 33, in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read restatement sections 17 and 22 in Rules of Contract Law 2012-2013 Statutory Supplement (Knapp), 2012, Aspen.

 

Lawyering Skills

§451.1

Prof. Harkins

 

 

No Initial Assignment

Lawyering Skills

§451.2

Prof. TBA

 

 

No Initial Assignment

Legal Writing I

§99.1

Prof. Day

 

 

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read pp. 3-22 and 43-50 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 5 and 131 – 142 in The Process of Legal Research (Kunz), 8th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I

§99.3

Prof. Slattery

 

 

In preparation for our first class, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A, B, C, D, and E, below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title), as you will use the assignment sheet posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignments described in item C, below.  Note also that the assignments and responses to questions listed under C and D, below, are due by 11:59pm the night before our first class (so I can review them and prepare accordingly).

(A) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end).

(B) Read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook.

(C) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type your answers directly into the assignment sheet posted in the Class 1 assignment dropbox on TWEN, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; I use these assignments to assess your ability to follow directions, assess your current reasoning skills, and to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(D) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(E) Point your web browser to http://www.questionpress.com/slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer the warmup and questionnaire questions you’ll find posted there.

 

Torts I

§111.1

Prof. Delman

 

 

Read the material and cases in the following order:  pp. 1-4, 5-6 (Weaver v. Ward), 4-5 (The Case of Thorns), 7-10 (Brown v. Kendall), 10-13 (Cohen v. Petty), 13-16 (Spano v. Perini), 17-20 (Garrat v. Dailey), 25-27 (McGuire v. Almy), and 24-25 (Ranson v. Kitner)  in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts: Cases and Materials (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation.

 

Read pp. 3-6 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

 

 

                                      INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR SPRING 2015  

 

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Please review your schedule and complete the assignments for your assigned classes.

 

INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS

SPRING 2015

Course

Assignment

Administrative Law
§250.1
Prof. Cromer Young

Read pp. 1-33 in Administrative Practice and Procedure (Funk), 5th Edition, West Publishing.

ADR Society
§425.1
Prof. Waldman

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure
§261.1
Prof. Kreit

Read pp. 1-12 (Participants and Stages of the Criminal Justice System), 19-20 (Key Provisions of the Bill of Rights), 31-34, and 37-51 (Prosecutorial Discretion) in Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (Chemerinsky), 2nd Edition, Aspen Publishing.

Advanced Civil Discovery Practice in CA
§489.1
Prof. Ramey

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Advanced Legal Research
§297.1
Prof. Templo

Register for this course on TWEN, found under Advanced Legal Research 297.1, Spring 2015, Templo. In the Course Materials folder, the initial assignment is in Week One folder.

Advanced Legal Research
§297.2
Prof. Inman

Register for this course on TWEN, found under Advanced Legal Research 297.2, Spring 2015, Inman.  Complete the CALI lesson, Legal Research 101: The Tools of the Trade using the link found in either Weekly Course Materials or in the Assignment & Quiz Drop Box.  Be sure to use that link; do not go directly to CALI. If you need to register for a CALI account, the authorization code can be found on the class TWEN course, under Weekly Course Materials.

 

Advanced Mediation
§419.1
Prof. Waldman

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

American Indian Law
§305.1
Prof. Wildenthal

​"FIL" refers to the required main textbook: Getches, Wilkinson, Williams & Fletcher, Cases and Materials on Federal Indian Law (West, 6th ed. 2011).

 

“ILS” refers to the required supplement: Indian Law Stories (Goldberg et al​, eds, Foundation, 2011).

 

Additional supplemental readings (such as recent court decisions) will also be assigned and provided to you free of charge by Prof. Wildenthal.

 

​The assigned reading in this course is fairly heavy, so you may wish to get a head start on the first two weeks' reading especially.  ​PLEASE N​OTE​that you DO need to read the material assigned for each class, INCLUDING the first class on Mon Jan 12, 2015, BEFORE each class. 

 

If you are enrolled in the course, feel free to email Prof. Wildenthal (bryanw@tjsl.edu)​ ​with any questions, or to receive any of the optional or assigned supplemental readings mentioned.​

 

 

Assigned for ​Mon Jan 12​ (Class 1):

 

Introduction to the course; background on American Indian Nations, history, and law.

 

FIL pp. v-viii (Preface), pp. 1-39 (ch. 1), and pp. 41-54 (Part One, ch. 2 through 2.A).

 

I will distribute, as an optional handout, portions of my college-level textbook, Wildenthal, Native American Sovereignty on Trial: A Handbook With Cases, Laws, and Documents (2003); none of that is assigned reading, but you may find interesting and useful the general introductory material on pp. 3-8, as well as (for the January 19 and 21 classes) the material on the Cherokee Cases on pp. 8-10 and 35-48.

 

Assigned for ​Wed ​Jan 14​ (Class 2):

 

Johnson v. McIntosh (1823) and the “Doctrine of Discovery.”

 

FIL pp. 54-73 (ch. 2.B-C).

 

ILS ch. 1, pp. 29-59.

 

Assigned for Mon Jan 19 (Class 3):

 

The early treaty era and historical background of the Cherokee Cases (1778-1830).

 

FIL pp. 74-102 (ch. 3 through Note 1 on p. 102).

 

Assigned supplemental reading:

 

Cherokee-U.S. Treaty of Holston River (1791) (7 Stat. 39; read pp. 39-42; 1792 and 1794 supplemental provisions may be omitted) and Cherokee-U.S. Treaty of Washington (1819) (7 Stat. 195; read pp. 195-97) (handouts provided).

Assigned for Wed Jan 21 (Class 4):​

 

The Cherokee Cases (1831-32) and their aftermath (1832-39).

 

FIL pp. 102-28 (ch. 3.D from Note 2 on p. 102).

 

ILS ch. 2, pp. 61-80.

 

Assigned supplemental reading:

 

Parts of Justice McLean’s concurrence in Worcester v. Georgia (1832) (handout provided): read p. 563 (1st two ¶¶s), pp. 581-83 (2nd ¶ break on p. 581 to 4th ¶ break on p. 583), and pp. 595-96 (from 1st ¶ break on p. 595).

 

Business Associations  
§115.1
Prof. Winchester

Register for this course on TWEN and read A. Gay Jenson Farms v. Cargill, which is available on TWEN under the link for Additional Required Reading

 

Read the following pages in Kleinberger: 

 

If you are using the 4th edition: Pages 1-4, 7-16, and 17-52.

If you are using the 3rd edition: Pages 1-4, 6-14, and 16-45.

 

If you don’t already have one, you must purchase a Response Card Keypad (clicker) and bring your keypad to the first day of class.  Used keypads may be sold or purchased on the student’s Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds.  New keypads can be purchased by logging onto http://store.turningtechnologies.com using the school code "g8Rd" (case sensitive) to receive the TJSL discounted price.  Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option; you must have a keypad for this class.  One keypad will work for multiple classes.  New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

 

Business Associations  
§115.2
Prof. Wenger

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Business Planning
§312.1
Prof. Tiefenbrun

Read Chapter 1 and try to solve Problem 1 (pp. l030-l033) in William H. Painter's Business Planning: Problems and Materials.  The book can be found in the Course Materials section of the Docket for this course.  Due to size restraints of the Docket it is posted in 3 parts.

 

On the basis of your reading of Chapter 1, think about the issues raised in Problem 1 and whether a single attorney should represent all three parties. Think about how you would negotiate for each of the parties individually in order to obtain his/her business objectives.  And think about your own business that you would like to plan and whether you want to set it up as a corporation or a non-corporate entity. Be prepared to discuss all in class.

 

CA Civil Procedure
§202.1
Prof. McCoy

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

CA Evidence
§225.1
Prof. Atkins

Read pp. 1-34 in California Evidence: Examples & Explanations (Goodman), 2011, Aspen.

 

Before the first class, read through the California Evidence Code. This will provide you with a good foundation and overview for the upcoming classroom sessions.

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.1
Prof. Cromer Young

Sign up for this course on TWEN.

 

Sign up for this course on www.chartacourse.com.

Civil Procedure I
§103.2
Prof. Slomanson

Navigate Course Website at <http://www.tjsl.edu/slomansonb/FED_CP1_e-book.html> & Watch Video on “Videos” (Course Website, click Videos).

 

Civil Procedure II
§104.1
Prof. Deo

Read 1. Paula Patt Intake Form; 2. Clinic Retainer Agreement; 3. Paula Patt Interview Transcript; 4. Student Notes to File After Interview with Paula Patt; 11. Dan Donner Intake Form; (we will watch both interviews in class) in Patt v. Donner: A Simulated Casefile for Learning Civil Procedure (Oppenheimer), 2013, Foundation Press.

 

Civil Procedure II
§104.2
Prof. Dalissio

Read 1. Paula Patt Intake Form; 2. Clinic Retainer Agreement; 3. Paula Patt Interview Transcript; 4. Student Notes to File After Interview with Paula Patt; 11. Dan Donner Intake Form; (we will watch both interviews in class) in Patt v. Donner: A Simulated Casefile for Learning Civil Procedure (Oppenheimer), 2013, Foundation Press.

 

Civil Procedure II
§104.3
Prof. Barger

Read 1. Paula Patt Intake Form; 2. Clinic Retainer Agreement; 3. Paula Patt Interview Transcript; 4. Student Notes to File After Interview with Paula Patt; 11. Dan Donner Intake Form; (we will watch both interviews in class) in Patt v. Donner: A Simulated Casefile for Learning Civil Procedure (Oppenheimer), 2013, Foundation Press.

 

Civil Procedure II
§104.4
Prof. Cataudella

Read 1. Paula Patt Intake Form; 2. Clinic Retainer Agreement; 3. Paula Patt Interview Transcript; 4. Student Notes to File After Interview with Paula Patt; 11. Dan Donner Intake Form; (we will watch both interviews in class) in Patt v. Donner: A Simulated Casefile for Learning Civil Procedure (Oppenheimer), 2013, Foundation Press.

 

Civil Procedure II
§104.5 & §104.6
Prof. Rierson

Read pp. 1-45 (starting with Paula Patt intake form and ending with Proof of Service), the initial casefile in Patt v. Donner: A Simulated Casefile for Learning Civil Procedure (Oppenheimer), 2013, Foundation Press.

Civil Procedure II
§104.7
Prof. Slomanson

Watch the movie A Civil Action, John Tavolta 1998 (online and on course reserve in the library).

Community Property
§167.1
Prof. Klueck

Read pp. 53-96,  in Community Property in California (Blumberg), 6th Edition, Aspen

 

Be prepared to answer the question: What do the deliberations of the California Constitutional Convention (p. 55-58) say about the role and legal status of women in mid-nineteenth century California/America?

 

Constitutional Law I
§135.1
Prof. Guzelian

Skim pp. 3-16 and read pp. 16-23, 26-33 (Marbury v. Madison), and 39-47 (Treatise) in Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition, Foundation Press.

Constitutional Law II 
§136.1
Prof. Herald

Register for the course on TWEN and review the course contents.

 

Read pp. 1437-1442 (Johnson), 1447-1448 (Barnette), 1448-1449 (Wooley), 1251-1254 (U.S. v. Playboy) and treatise: pp. 949-60, 997-1002, 1097-98, 1100-1102 in Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition. 

 

You must already own or purchase a response keypad (clicker) compatible with the Turing Technology system, or software needed to use the Turing clicker system from a web-enabled device, PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS. Used keypads may be sold or purchased on the student’s Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds.  New keypads can be purchased by logging onto http://store.turningtechnologies.com using the school code "g8Rd" (case sensitive) to receive TJSL discounted price.  Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option.  One keypad will work for multiple classes.  New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

 

Constitutional Law II 
§136.2
Prof. Wildenthal

There is no required textbook in this course. The primary course readings are cases in the public domain which Prof. Wildenthal will ​provide​ to you in PDF format (or you may obtain them yourself online). Some additional readings will also be assigned and made available (free of charge).

 

​Please note that you DO need to read the assigned constitutional provision and cases indicated below BEFORE the first class on Mon Jan 12, 2015.​

 

If you are enrolled in the course, feel free to email Prof. Wildenthal (bryanw@tjsl.edu)​ and he ​will​ send you any ​needed cases and readings.

 

Assigned for ​Mon Jan 12​ (Class 1):

 

​Standing, ripeness, and the “particularized injury” requirement; mootness and injuries “capable of repetition, yet evading review.”

 

U.S. Const. Art. III, § 2, cl. 1.

 

Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973): read parts of Justice Blackmun’s opinion of the Court, pp. 116-17 (before Part I), pp. 120-22 (Part II), pp. 123-25 (Part IV through IV.A), and pp. 127-29 (Part IV.C).

 

Los Angeles v. Lyons, 461 U.S. 95 (1983): read Justice White’s opinion of the Court and part of Justice Marshall’s dissent, pp. 97-134 (through Part IV of the dissent; omit fns. 13-18 and 20-23 in the dissent).

 

Assigned for ​Wed ​Jan 14​ (Class 2):

More on standing: taxpayer standing; standing to appeal; associational standing; third-party standing.

 

Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn, 563 U.S. ___ [131 S. Ct. 1436] (2011) (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/10pdf/09-987.pdf): read Justice Kennedy’s opinion of the Court, pp. 1-19, Justice Scalia’s concurrence, pp. 1-2, and Justice Kagan’s dissent, pp. 1-24.

 

Hollingsworth v. Perry, 570 U.S. ___ [133 S. Ct. 2652] (2013) (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/12pdf/12-144_8ok0.pdf): read Chief Justice Roberts’s opinion of the Court, pp. 1-17, and Justice Kennedy’s dissent, pp. 1-14.

 

Constitutional Law II 
§136.3
Prof. Vandevelde

Register for the course on TWEN.

 

Read pp. 1437-1442 (Johnson), 1447-1448 (Barnette), and 1448-1449 (Wooley), in Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials (Varat), 14th Edition. 

 

Contracts Drafting
§465.1
Prof. Casalins

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Contracts I
§101.1
Prof. Golden

Read the short week 1 course introduction Handout that can be found in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket (www.tjsl.edu/document-library) for this course.  You will receive instructions on how to access the docket during your week 1 orientation.  This short course introduction should be read first.

 

Read pp. 31-48 (Ch.1, §3(A)) in Contracts: Cases and Materials (Farnsworth), 8th Edition.

 

Read Restatement 2nd of Contracts: §§1, 71-74, 79, 81and Uniform Commercial Code: pp. 263-264 (“Compiler’s Note”), §§1-103, 1-201(b)(3) & (12), 1-304, 2-102, 2-103(1); 2-105(1) and 2-106 in the required supplement, Selections for Contracts (Farnsworth), 2013.

 

NOTE: Readings from the Restatement 2nd of Contracts and Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) are in the required supplement, Selections for Contracts.  The 2013 edition of this supplement contains two versions of Article 1 of the UCC.  For purposes of this initial assignment all readings from Article 1 are from the "2001" version (pp. 265-282).

 

Contracts I
§101.2
Prof. Greene

Read Ray v. Eurice Brothers, p. 33, in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read restatement sections 17 and 22 in Rules of Contract Law 2012-2013 Statutory Supplement (Knapp), 2012, Aspen.

 

Contracts II 
§102.1
Prof. Templin

Sign up for this course on TWEN, the first reading assignment will be posted and sent to all enrolled student during the first week of January.

 

All students registered for the course are required to purchase the Turning Point clicker. These remote control devices are a response system which allows you to easily provide feedback to questions posed in class.  Turning Point sells a variety of models. You do not need the most sophisticated. The cheaper RF Clicker (Product ID: RFC-02-BX) will work fine. Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option; you must have a clicker keypad for this class.  Clickers are available for purchase from: (1) Turning Point at https://store.turningtechnologies.com/ (use the school code of g8Rd); (2) used units have been available for purchase at the TJSL Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds and (3) Amazon, eBay and other outlets. New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

 

Contracts II 
§102.2
Prof. Lee

Read pages 140-153 of Daniel Barnhizer's article, Inequality of Bargaining Power, 76 U. Colo. L. Rev. 139 (2005).  This article can be found on Westlaw or Lexis using this citation. 

 

Contracts II 
§102.3
Prof. Greene

Write a one page essay on why you wanted to go to law school. 

Controlled Substances Law
§492.1
Prof. Kreit

Read pp. 1-18 in Controlled Substances: Crime, Regulation, and Policy (Kreit), 2013, Carolina Academic Press.

Criminal Law
§105.1
Prof. Steinberg

Read pp. 32-48 (Principles of Punishment) and pp. 49-50 (Queen v. Dudley and Stephens) in Cases and Materials on Criminal Law (Dressler), 6th Edition, West.

 

Read pp. 11-23 in Understanding Criminal Law (Dressler), 6th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Criminal Law
§105.2
Prof. Kaye

Register for this course on TWEN.

 

For our first day of class, please complete Topics 1 and 2, below.  For our second day of class, please complete Topic 3.  All page numbers are in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen, unless otherwise noted.  

 

Topic 1: Background Reading

Note: These readings are background material about the criminal justice system. We will not discuss these readings in a systematic way during our first week, but we will occasionally refer to them throughout the semester, and you will need to know the material in these readings in order to fully understand many of the materials we read and discuss throughout the semester. I will also consider these materials fair game for any tests we have this semester.

The Structure of the Criminal Justice System, pp. 1-8
Criminal Justice Procedures, pp. 8-12
Note on Formal Trial Procedure, pp. 17-19
In re Winship and notes, pp. 31-36
The Burden of Production Versus The Burden of Persuasion, p. 41
Presumptions, pp. 46-47

Topic 2: Elemental Analysis In The Criminal Law

Reading and Exercises: Elemental Analysis In The Criminal Law (Handout available on TWEN).

 

Topic 3: Analyzing The Mental State Element – The Basics

Model Penal Code, § 2.02, pp. 1202-03
Note on the Model Penal Code Reforms, pp. 252-53
Comment to § 2.02 & Note 1, pp. 253-56
Exercise: Model Penal Code Mental States (Handout available on TWEN)
Dressler §§ 10.01, 10.04[A][1], [A][3][A], [B], [C], [D], [E], 10.06

 

Criminal Law
§105.3
Prof. Keller

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Criminal Motion Practice 
§333.1
Prof. Wise

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Criminal Procedure 
§106.1
Prof. Steinberg

Read pp. 3-4 (Introductory Note), 5-9 (Katz v. United States), and 10-16 (United States v. White) in Criminal Procedure: Constitutional Constraints Upon Investigation and Proof (Tomkovicz) 7th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read Oliver v. United States in Criminal Procedure Course Materials (Steinberg), 2015, available from Legal Books Distributing.

 

Criminal Procedure 
§106.2
Prof. Kreit

Read pp. 1-24 and 27 in Criminal Procedure: Investigation (Chemerinsky), 2nd Edition, Aspen Publishing.

Cyber Law
§330.1
Prof. Ghirardelli

Read chapter 1 in Bellia, Berman, Frischmann and Post’s Cyberlaw: Problems of Policy and Jurisprudence in the Information Age (Bellia), 4th Edition.

 

Death Penalty Seminar
§228.1
Prof. Gerber

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Employment Law
§644.3
Prof. Lee

Read pp. 3-20 (The Meaning of Work; Rise and Fall of Freedom of Contract) in Work Law: Cases and Materials (Crain), 2nd Edition.

Entertainment Law 
§237.1
Prof. Greene

Write a one page essay on your career goals and dream position.

Entertainment Law Transactions
§336.1
Prof. Novak

No Initial Assignment

Environmental Law
§275.1
Prof. Rosenbaum

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Evidence
§138.1
Prof. Cohn

Read pp. 68-77 and 79-106 in Evidence; Cases and Materials (Park), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Federal Rule of Evidence (FRE) 106.

 

View/listen to the Ruling on Fuhrman Tapes (California v. O.J. Simpson).  There is a copy available on course reserve in the library.

 

Evidence
§138.2
Prof. Christensen

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Externship I
§697.1
Prof. Tropp

No Initial Assignment

Externship II
§698.1
Prof. Tropp

No Initial Assignment

Federal Income Taxation
§204.1
Prof. Winchester

Register for this course on TWEN.  Follow the link for the “Worksheet Drop Box."  Click the button in the upper right hand corner labeled “Manage         Anonymous ID's.”  Provide your Exam ID in the box labeled “Primary course ID.” 

 

Read pp. 3 – 6, and 16 – 32 (omit the Mayo case) in Fundamentals of Federal Income Taxation (Freeland), 17th edition, Foundation Press.

 

Read the Class 1 Handout. It is available in TWEN under the tab for “Class Slides and Handouts.”

 

Complete the Class 1 Worksheet.  Submit the Worksheet through the Worksheet Drop Box on TWEN by January 12

 

Immigration Law
§241.1
Prof. Durst

Read pp. 1-24 in Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy (Legomsky), 5th Edition.

 

Read pp. 156-end, My Life As An Undocumented Immigrant by Jose Antonio Vargas in Immigration Law Course Supplemental Materials (Durst), 2014, available from Legal Books Distributing.

 

Immigration Removal Defense Seminar
§547.1
Prof. Knowles

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Intellectual Property Research Project-Part 2
§652.1
Prof. Berholtz

No Initial Assignment

International Human Rights, Sex Trafficking & Child Soldiers
§403.1
Prof. Tiefenbrun

Read Chapter 1, pages 3-14, and read (skim) the following Treaties in the Appendix in Women’s International and Comparative Human Rights (Tiefenbrun), 2012, Carolina Academic Press: UN Charter, ICCPR, ICESCR (and Protocols), Vienna Convention on Law of Treaties, U.S. Constitution, American Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, African Charter.

 

Think about which fundamental human rights are most frequently violated and in what circumstances (e.g. war, refugee camps, child labor in poverty stricken countries).

 

Think about which fundamental human rights are most often violated with regard to women in particular and in what circumstances.

 

Do you think slavery is dead in the United States, and if it is not, give examples of contemporary slavery.

 

International Law
§238.1
Prof. Vandevelde

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Introduction to Criminal Trial Practice
§571.1
Prof. Various

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Introduction to Intellectual Property
§503.1
Prof. Various

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

Please check back for updates

Introduction to IP Practice
§517.1
Prof. Semeraro

Sign up for this course on TWEN.

 

Read the Trade Secrets Protection paper located in the Course Materials section for this course on the Docket.

 

Locate and read the following cases:

  Amoco Production Co. v. Laird, 622 N.E.2d 912 (Ind. 1993)

  CDI Energy Services, Inc. v. West River Pumps, Inc., 567 F.3d 398 (8th Cir. 2009)

  Cemen Tech Inc. v. Three D Industries, LLC, 753 N.W.2d 1 (Iowa 2008)

  Rockwell Graphic Systems, Inc. v. DEV Industries, Inc. (925 F.2d 174 (7th Cir. 1991)

  E.I. duPont deNemours & Co. v. Christopher, 431 F.2d 1012 (5th Cir. 1970)

 

Introduction to Mediation
§423.1
Prof. Cobalt

Read the Initial chapters titled “Overview” and “The Process” in the required book, The Mediator's Handbook: Revised and Expanded Fourth Edition (Beer), 2012, Edition, New Society.

 

Write a thoughtful written response answering ALL of the following questions:

 

1. Describe a conflict in which you personally have been involved.  Why did the conflict occur? 

2. In what ways did the conflict impact you emotionally?

3. If the conflict was resolved, how did it get resolved?  What was helpful in getting it resolved? 

4. If it was not resolved, why not?  What would you have wanted from the other person?  What do you think the other person would have wanted from you? 

     5. Why did you go to law school?  How has your law school experience met (or not met)      your expectations for attending?

 

Judicial Seminar
§702.1/703.1
Prof. Tropp

No Initial Assignment

Law & Psychology
§361.1
Prof. Herald

Register for this course on TWEN and read How Lawyers (Ought to) Think by Lubet (posted on the TWEN site).

 

Read pp. xvii-xxix, 5-8, and 79-100 in Your Brain and Law School (Herald), 2014, Carolina Academic Press.

 

Skim Volokh, Writing a Student Article.

 

Law of Amateur Sports
§511.1
Prof. Green, Jack

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Law & Economics
§440.1
Prof. Guzelian

Read Bastiat, The Law; John Stuart Mill, On Thinking; and Kelo v. City of New London.  These can be found on the Docket in the course materials for this course.

Law Practice Management
§216.1
Prof. Sanzo

Read chapter 1 (Is The Practice of Law a Business), sections 1.01-1.02, pp. 3-19 in Materials and Cases on Law Practice Management (Steele), 2004, LexisNexis.  Prepare to discuss questions 1-4, pp. 19-21.

 

Bring your current resume to the first class.

 

Lawyering Skills
§451.1 & §451.2
Prof. Harkins

No Initial Assignment

Legal Foundations
§533.1
Prof. Neal

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Principles
All
Prof. Harkins & Prof. Bolus

Register for this course on TWEN.  Complete the Class 1 Reading Sheet (available on TWEN under the “Class One” folder) after you complete the reading.  Submit it before class via the TWEN Drop Box. Review your Defamation notes and outline and bring the information with you to class.

 

 

Read: chapters 1-3 in Open Book: Succeeding on Exams from the First Day of Law School (Friedman), 2011, Aspen Publishing.

 

Read pp. 106-114 in Mastering the Law School Exam (Darrow-Kleinhaus), 2006, Thomson West.

 

Legal Synthesis I Group
§540.1
Prof. Sacuzzo

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis II Group
§541.1
Prof. Sacuzzo

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis Small Group
§464.1
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis Small Group
§464.2
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis Small Group
§464.3
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis Small Group
§464.4
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Synthesis Small Group
§464.5
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing I
§99.1
Prof. Day

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read pp. 3-22 and 43-50 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 5 and 131 – 142 in The Process of Legal Research (Kunz), 8th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§99.3
Prof. Slattery

In preparation for our first class, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A, B, C, D, and E, below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title), as you will use the assignment sheet posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignments described in item C, below.  Note also that the assignments and responses to questions listed under C and D, below, are due by 11:59pm the night before our first class (so I can review them and prepare accordingly).

(A) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end).

(B) Read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook.

(C) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type your answers directly into the assignment sheet posted in the Class 1 assignment dropbox on TWEN, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; I use these assignments to assess your ability to follow directions, assess your current reasoning skills, and to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(D) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(E) Point your web browser to http://www.questionpress.com/slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer the warmup and questionnaire questions you’ll find posted there.

 

Legal Writing II
§199.1
Prof. Oetting

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.2
Prof. TBA

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.3
Prof. Semeraro

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.4
Prof. Cropley

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.5
Prof. Gallagher

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.6
Prof. Nwanna

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.7
Prof. Ramey

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Legal Writing II
§199.8
Prof. Rexrode

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Mandarin Chinese for Lawyers
§453.1
Prof. Gee-Schweiger

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Mastering the Performance Test
§644.1
Prof. Simon

Register for this course on TWEN and read the Syllabus posted on the TWEN site.

 

Read pp. 1-18 in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013, Aspen Publishing.

 

Mastering the Performance Test
§644.2
Prof. Lee

Read pp. 1-18 in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013.

Mastering the Performance Test
§644.3
Prof. Herald

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Mastering the Performance Test
§644.4
Prof. Markey

Register for this course on TWEN.  Download the syllabus and read the Course Introduction.

Read pp. 1-5 in California Performance Test Workbook: Preparation for the Bar Exam (Basick), 2013, Aspen Publishing. 

 

Military Justice
§435.1
Prof. Siegel

Review  Manual for Courts-Martial [MCM] and Appendices; RCM 101 to 109; 502 and 1201-1210, 1301-1306

Article 16, 25, 65-76; UCMJ (Appendix 2, 8, and 9 MCM).

 

Read, brief, and be ready to discuss Middendorf v. Henry, 425 US 25 (1976).

 

Modern Family Law
§245.1
Prof. Day

Read pp. 105-110; 221-228; 110-120 in Modern Family Law: Cases and Materials (Weisberg), 5th Edition, Aspen Publishing.

 

Read CA CIVIL § 43.5; CA CIVIL § 1590.

 

Moot Court Society
§355.1
Prof. Semeraro

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Negotiations Theory & Skills
§292.1
Prof. Waldman

Read chapters 1, 2, and 3 in The Counsel--At-Law: A Collaborative Approach to Client Interviewing and Counseling (Cochran), 3rd Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Complete Ch.1.3 Questions 3 at pp. 87-89.

Patent Clinic Seminar
§572.1
Prof. Afshar

Read the SBLC Policies and Procedures Handbook posted on the Docket in the course materials for this course.

 

Read the California Rules of Professional Conduct §§3-100, 3-110 & 3-500.

 

Pre Bar Fundamentals
§646
All

Please complete the pre-class questionnaire located on the Docket in the course materials for this course and bring a HARD COPY to our first class.  I will not accept emailed copies.  Part of exam success is reading comprehension as well as following directions.  This is a credit/no credit assignment.  The purpose is to assess how you are feeling heading into the exam.  There are no correct answers-everyone has different thoughts about the bar exam.  We will discuss your answers in a later class, but the identity of the contributors will be kept confidential. 

 

Professional Responsibility 
§140.1
Prof. Schwabach

Read pp. 1-14 and 21-78 in Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law (Lerman), 3rd Edition, Aspen.

 

 

Professional Responsibility 
§140.2
Prof. Kaye

The readings are all in Learning Professional Responsibility (Christensen), 2014, West Publishing.  

 

READING FOR CLASS #1

 

Preface, pp. vii-ix

Introduction, pp. 1-3

Chapter 1, pp. 4-8

Chapter 2, pp. 9-17

Chapter 3, 18-29 

 

READING FOR CLASS #2

 

Chapter 4, pp. 30-48

Chapter 5, pp. 49-60

Professional Sports Law
§530.1
Prof. Grossman

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Property I
§141.1
Prof. Schwabach

Read pp. 18-35 in Property (Dukeminier), 8th Edition, Aspen Publishing.

Property I
§141.2
Prof. Wright

For January 12: read pp. 1-7 in An Introduction to Property Law in the United States of America (Semeraro), 2013.

 

For January 14: read pp. 25-37 in An Introduction to Property Law in the United States of America (Semeraro), 2013.

 

Property II
§142.1
Prof. Markey

Register for the course on TWEN.  Download the supplement and read the Introduction to Property II.

 

Read pp. 541-558 and 570-582 (Introduction to Buying and Selling Real Estate, The Contract of Sale: Statute of Frauds and Marketable Title) and brief the cases in Property (Dukeminier), 8th Edition, Aspen.

 

Property II
§142.2
Prof. Simon

Register for this course on TWEN and read the Syllabus posted on the TWEN site.

 

Read the following:

 

For 8th Edition of Property, (Dukeminier), read pp. 504-530. Please also do book problems on pp. 514-15, problem 2;  page 525, problem 4 (all parts); page 527, problems 1-4

 

OR

 

For 7th Edition of Property, (Dukeminier), read  pp. 482; 489-508 and Village Commons (full text available at http://www.in.gov/judiciary/opinions/pdf/03040802par.pdf) or you can read the edited version of the case in the 2014 edition of Dukeminier, on reserve at the TJSL Library. Please also do book problems on p. 491-92, problem 2; p. 502, problem 4 (all parts); p. 504, problems 1-4.

 

Property II
§142.3
Prof. Semeraro

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Public Interest Lawyering
§383.1
Prof. Neiman

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Remedies
§166.1
Prof. Templin

For your first class, complete the two tasks described below. These two tasks require you to use the following material from your required text, Remedies: Cases and Problems by Shoben, et. al.  (5th edition):

 

Preface, pages v-vii

Expanded Table of Contents, pages xv-xxii

Chapter One, pages 2-12

 

Task One (The Big Picture)

 

·    Read the Preface ( pages v-vii) to understand how the book is structured.

·    Read pp 2-5 in Chapter One which discusses the four different types of remedies. As you read this material, cross reference the type of remedy to the Expanded Table of Contents (pages xv-xxii) to see how the book is structured and what issues come up. The four types of Remedies and the corresponding section of the book (i.e. the PART) are:

 

1. Coercive Remedies: (See Part II Injunctions & Specific Performance)

2. Damages: (See Part III Damages)

3. Restitution: (See Part IV Restitutionary Remedies)

4. Declaratory Relief: (See Part V Conclusion; Completing the Remedial Picture)

 

·    Read  pp 5-6 Remedies at Law and in Equity for a very brief introduction to historical roots of different types of remedies. We will have more history on the Law v. Equity split as we proceed through the course. 

               

Task Two (Problems):

 

Read the rest of the chapter – i.e., Introductory Remedies Problems (pp. 6-12).  Read through all of the problems once. On the second read, develop answers to the questions. Come to class prepared to discuss the problems and address the questions asked.  Note:  The problems present issues that we will cover later in the course. Although we haven’t studied the law yet, it is a useful exercise for you to consider the possible remedies issues. Don’t worry about not knowing the law yet. Answer the questions given what you know and your general life experience.

 

All students registered for the course are required to purchase the Turning Point clicker. These remote control devices are a response system which allows you to easily provide feedback to questions posed in class.  Turning Point sells a variety of models. You do not need the most sophisticated. The cheaper RF Clicker (Product ID: RFC-02-BX) will work fine. Do not purchase a license for the web-based polling option; you must have a clicker keypad for this class.  Clickers are available for purchase from: (1) Turning Point at https://store.turningtechnologies.com/ (use the school code of g8Rd); (2) used units have been available for purchase at the TJSL Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds and (3) Amazon, eBay and other outlets. New keypads will take 7-10 days for delivery.

 

Remedies
§166.2
Prof. Wezelman

Read pp. 1-41and 49-52 in Remedies (Rendleman), 8th Edition.

                          

Read pp. 1-2 of the Class 1 Handout posted in the “Course Materials” section for this course on the Docket. 

 

Scholarly Legal Writing
§418.1
Prof. Wildenthal

Read the following assignments BEFORE the class session indicated. Contact Prof. Wildenthal at bryanw@tjsl.edu to get the Volokh article assigned for January 14.

 

Wednesday, January 14:

 

Introduction to the course. We will get acquainted, discuss the scholarly enterprise you are embarking upon, and the process of developing and defending your Note Proposals (both Topic or "Subject," and Thesis).

 

FF (3d ed.) pp. 1-8 (ch. 1.A-1.B.1), 11-13 (ch. 1.C), and pp. 14-22 (ch. 2 through 2.A).

 

FF (4th ed.) pp. 1-9 (ch. 1.A-1.B.1), pp. 12-13 (ch. 1.C), and pp. 14-26 (ch. 2 through 2.B).

 

Required supplement reading (handout provided):

 

Eugene Volokh, Test Suites: A Tool For Improving Student Articles, 52 J. Legal Ed. 440 (2002).

 

Please email me your Note Topic Proposal when you submit it to Law Review; I will print out sufficient copies to distribute to the entire class on January 21, so I and your classmates can discuss them and provide collaborative and helpful comments.

 

Wednesday, January 21:

 

Discussing your Note topic and thesis; researching and drafting the background section; proper quotation and citation of sources; “finding tools” vs. authoritative and citable sources; problems with Internet research.

 

FF (3d ed.) pp. 26-51 (ch. 2.C-D), pp. 52-59 (ch. 3 through 3.A), and pp. 104-24 (ch. 6).

 

FF (4th ed.) pp. 22-45 (ch. 2.B-C), pp. 46-53 (ch. 3 through 3.A), and pp. 96-116 (ch. 6).

 

Complete and bring to class FF Exercises 6.1 and 6.2 (3d ed., pp. 112-16; 4th ed., pp. 118-23) (no need to make extra copies). I’ll also distribute Exercies 6.3 and 6.4 from the 4th ed. of FF (pp. 123-24; those will be optional).

 

The answers to Exercises 6.1 and 6.2 are provided by FF (answers to 6.3 and 6.4 are in the 4th ed.), but you should write up your own brief analyses, at least for 6.1 and 6.2, identifying plagiarism or improper attribution issues as best you can, before looking at the answers. Then read the answers in FF (Appendix B) (3d ed., pp. 194-97; 4th ed., pp. 208-11). You should reconsider and revise your answers as needed, based on the answers in FF, but please preserve and bring to class your original written analysis as a basis for discussion, and hand it in to me at the end of class (along with any revisions you made). We will also discuss your Note Topic Proposals.

 

Please email me your Note Thesis Proposal when you submit it to Law Review; I will print out sufficient copies to distribute to the entire class on January 28.

 

Small Business Law Center Clinic Seminar
§523.1
Prof. Nieman/Slattery

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Solo Practice Concentration
§600.1
Prof. McCoy

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Supreme Court Appellate Advocacy
§474.1
Prof. Steinberg

For our first class, students should read the following essays:

 

Theories of Constitutional Interpretation, available at http://cstl-cla.semo.edu/hhill/ui305/constitutional%20interpretationa.htm

 

(this essay focuses on originalism)

 

-- and --

 

Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965) available on Westlaw, and at http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?navby=CASE&court=US&vol=381&page=479

 

In Griswold, read just the majority opinion (Justice Douglas) and the dissent filed by Justice Black.

 

Torts I
§111.1
Prof. Delman

Read the material and cases in the following order:  pp. 1-4, 5-6 (Weaver v. Ward), 4-5 (The Case of Thorns), 7-10 (Brown v. Kendall), 10-13 (Cohen v. Petty), 13-16 (Spano v. Perini), 17-20 (Garrat v. Dailey), 25-27 (McGuire v. Almy), and 24-25 (Ranson v. Kitner)  in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts: Cases and Materials (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation.

 

Read pp. 3-6 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen.

 

Torts II 
§112.1 & §112.4
Prof. Dyson

No Initial Assignment

Torts II 
§112.2 & §112.3
Prof. Bisom-Rapp

Read pp. 713-719, 719-726 (Rylands v. Fletcher),              729-737 (Indiana Harbor), 737-739 (Foster v. Preston Mill), 739-741 (Golden v. Amory), and 741-744 (Sandy v. Bushey) in Torts: Cases and Materials (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

 

Read pp. 247-263 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read pp. 321-341 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition Aspen Publishing.

 

Trademark Clinic Seminar
§574.1
Prof. Lane

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Trademark & Unfair Competition Law
§329.1
Prof. Rierson

Read pp. 3-42 in Trademarks and Unfair Competition Law and Policy (Dinwoodie), 4th Edition, Aspen Publishing.

 

Locate and read the Lanham Act § 43(a) (15 U.S.C. § 1125 (a)).

Trial Practice 
§170.1 & §170.2
Prof. Grossman

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Trial Practice 
§170.3
Prof. Siegel

Read Dixon v. Providential Life Insurance Company (Stien), 2000, NITA. 

 

Read chapters 1, 2 and 3 in Trial Advocacy (Bergman), 3rd Edition, Thomson West.

 

Complete problem 3.9 in appendix C of the syllabus and posted in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket for this course.  Prepare case analysis for both prosecution and defense in problem 3.9.  Develop suggested themes and theories for each side.

 

Trial Practice 
§170.4
Prof. Fields-Bernard

Read chapters 1 and 2 (pages 51-55 only) in Trial Process: Law Tactics & Ethics (Tanford), 4th Edition.

 

Skim Hunter and Kesler case files found in Trial Practice Problems and Case Files (Tanford), 4th Edition.

Veteran's Legal Assistance Clinic
§429.1
Prof. Berenson

Register for this course on TWEN and read the Clinic Primer.

 

Read chapters 1-3 in Clinical Legal Education: A Textbook for Law School Clinical Programs (Chavkin), 2002.

Wills & Trusts
§171.1
Prof. Wenger

Not  Yet Received from the Professor

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Wills & Trusts
§171.2
Prof. Martindill

Read the Introduction and Class 1 of Wills and Trusts Course Outline to be posted in the “Course Materials” section of the Docket for this course on the Docket. 

Read Probate Codes 6400 and 6401(a) (b).  Purchase of a hard copy of the California Probate Code is not required.  Students must have access to the Probate Code and read the assigned Sections prior to class.

Know the following introductory definitions:

A) Will or Testament- a document that is a lawful, voluntary disposition of assets upon death
B) Codicil-a written supplement or amendment to a Will
C) Testator/trix (Transferor) - one who makes a Will
D) Devise-gift of real property
E) Bequest-gift of personal property
F) Legacy-gift of money
G) Heir/Heir-at-law - those persons designated by statute as being next in line to inherit
H) Beneficiary (Transferee)-those persons named in the Will to inherit
I) Issue- lineal descendants of decedent
J) Probate, Surrogate, Orphan’s Court-Court having jurisdiction to hear matters arising from decedent’s estates or trusts

K) Testate-Decedent dies leaving a valid Will which directs disposition of estate

L) Intestate-Decedent dies without a Will and estate is distributed according to state law

M) Decedent-Person who died and whose estate distribution is in question