Initial Assignments

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Students are responsible for preparing accordingly.

 

These lists are updated as input is received from the professors. Please check back for updates.

 

All Thomas Jefferson School of Law course books can be purchased through Legal Books Distributing at www.legalbooksdistributing.comLegal Books Distributing’s contact information can be found on their website.

 

Used books and response card keypads (clickers) may be sold or purchased on the students’ Classifieds page at www.tjsl.edu/classifieds.

 

The full listing for Fall 2014 will be posted before July 25, 2014.

 

INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR FALL 2014 INCOMING STUDENTS

Course

Assignment

Civil Procedure I
§103.1 & §103.2

Professor Deo

Read Introduction: Freer 1-10, 15-18; Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (FRCP) 1.

 

Read Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Federal Question: Freer 177-180, 214-218 n.1, 222-230; 28 U.S.C. 1331, 1338; U.S. Constitution Art. III, Sec. 2.

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.3

Professor Rierson

Read A Civil Action (Harr), 1995, Random House.  We will use the lawsuit described in this book to illustrate many of the procedural issues addressed in the course. 

 

Read pp. 3-36 (Introduction) and 39-72 (Subject Matter Jurisdiction - Diversity) in Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Glannon), 2nd Edition, Aspen.

 

Contracts I
§101.1

Professor Templin

The initial assignment for this course will be made available and provided to you as a pdf by the professor on August 13, 2014 – the Wednesday before classes start.

 

Contracts I
§101.2

Professor Lee

Read pp. 1-17 and complete problem 1-1 in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

 

Contracts I
§101.3

Professor Greene

Read Ray v. Eurice Brothers, p. 33, in Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (Knapp), 7th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read restatement sections 17 and 22 in Rules of Contract Law 2012-2013 Statutory Supplement (Knapp), 2012, Aspen.

 

Criminal Law
§105.2

Professor Steinberg

Read pp. 32-48 (Principles of Punishment) and pp. 49-50 (Queen v. Dudley and Stephens) in Criminal Law and Its Processes (Kadish), 9th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 11-23 in Understanding Criminal Law (Dressler), 6th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Lawyering Skills

All sections

All Professors

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read Lindh v. Surman and review Chapters 10-12 in Reading Like a Lawyer (McKinney), 2nd Edition, Carolina Academic Press.

 

Review Chapter 15 and pp. 149-158, in Expert Learning for Law Students (Schwartz), 2008, Carolina Academic Press.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.1 & §099.4

Professor Day

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation).

 

Read pp. 3-22 and 43-50 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 5 and 131 – 142 in The Process of Legal Research (Kunz), 8th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.2 & §099.5

Professor Durst

Read chapter 1 and prepare exercise 1B for class discussion in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.3

Professor Rierson

Read pp. 3-9 (Rules and Policies), 11-22 (Sources of Law), 43-53 (Precedent and Stare Decisis) and complete the exercises in chapters 2 and 4 for review in class in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 9-19 (The US Legal System) in Just Research: Preparing for Practice (Enquist), 4th Edition, Aspen.

Legal Writing I
§099.6

Professor Slattery

For the first class session, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A-E below.  Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title) as you will use the template answer form posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignment described in item C below.  You will learn how to use TWEN during your orientation.  Note also that your first assignment is due by 11:59pm on the night before our first class.

 (a) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end);

(b) read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook;

(c) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach).  You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3). 

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d.  In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense.  When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”).  In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type (or word process) your answers, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise.  Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; in addition to your reasoning skills and ability to spot and follow directions, I use these assignments to get a sense of your basic writing ability.  Please also spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(d) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on TWEN).

(e) Point your web browser to www.questionpress.com/prof_slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer both the reflective prompt and questionnaire you’ll find posted there.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.7 & §099.8

Professor Wright

Read pp. 3-40 (through Exercise 3-A) and complete exercises 1-B and 3-A in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method (Dernbach), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 1-14 and 217 – end in the Legal Writing I Workbook (TJSL), 2014, Available from Legal Books Distributing.

 

Draft a relatively short biography (approximately 2 pages).   

 

Please bring 2 copies of the Dernbach Exercises 1-B and 3-A and one copy of your biography to the first day of class.  At the beginning of class you'll turn in your biography and one copy of your Dernbach Exercises. 

 

Torts I
§111.2 & §111.3

Professor Bisom-Rapp

Register for this course on TWEN (you will learn about TWEN and WestLaw, and receive your login and password during your orientation) and read pp. 1-10 in the Torts I Supplemental Materials posted on the site.

 

Read pp. 1-4 (Introduction), 17-20 (Concept of Intent), notes 22-24 (do not read Spivey), and 24-28 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.

Read pp. 3-5 in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 5th Edition, Aspen.

 

Read pp. 3-4 (1.01A-C) and 5-6 (1.01 E-F) in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Torts I
§111.1 & §111.4

Professor Dyson

Read Battery (beginning with Wallace v. Rosen) p. 31-37, & Assault, p. 37-41 in Prosser, Wade and Schwartz's Torts (Schwartz), 12th Edition, Foundation Press.
 

Read pp. 3-4 in Understanding Torts (Diamond), 4th Edition, LexisNexis.

 

Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault, in The Law of Torts: Examples and Explanations (Glannon), 4th Edition, Aspen (Optional, but recommended).