Required Courses

All first year students are required to take the list of courses below under 1L Required Courses. After completing the first year curriculum, students may take the remaining required courses and electives in any order they wish, subject to course prerequisites. Students also are required to take an elective course that satisfies the law school’s upper level writing requirement.

1L Required Courses

  • Rules relating to jurisdiction and venue, pleadings, motion practice, discovery, jury trials, appellate jurisdiction and res judicata are covered in this course.

  • Rules relating to jurisdiction and venue, pleadings, motion practice, discovery, jury trials, appellate jurisdiction and res judicata are covered in this course.

  • This course studies the law relating to formation of contracts, the Statute of Frauds, third-party beneficiary contracts, assignment of rights and delegation of duties and liability for breach of contract, including the law of conditions and discharge.

  • This course studies the law relating to formation of contracts, the Statute of Frauds, third-party beneficiary contracts, assignment of rights and delegation of duties and liability for breach of contract, including the law of conditions and discharge.

  • This course covers the basic substantive criminal law, discussion of concepts of mens rea, actus reus, causation, the inchoate offences and the Model Penal Code. The basic common law crimes and defenses comprise the majority of the course.

  • Lawyering Skills I is a one-unit, credit/no-credit course that meets weekly to provide instruction and guidance in how to read and think in ways necessary for success in law school, on the bar exam, and in practice. During weekly class meetings, students learn about and practice strategies and approaches for reading and writing for law school and preparing for law school exams. Through structured practice with case briefing, rule deconstruction, rule extraction and rule synthesis, outlining, inferential reasoning, and essay organization, students learn how to study and learn the law. Students build their academic and study skills using subject matter materials connected to at least one doctrinal course in which students are concurrently enrolled.

  • This course is designed to introduce practical lawyering skills such as identifying the legal rules that will affect a potential client, applying the rules to that client's problem and communicating the results of the analysis.

  • This course builds upon the concepts taught in Legal Writing I. Students research and write trial court and appellate court briefs and participate in an appellate oral argument.

  • An examination of civil liability independent of contract, including torts based on intentional conduct, strict liability or negligence.

  • An examination of civil liability independent of contract, including torts based on intentional conduct, strict liability or negligence.

Remaining Required Courses

  • This course provides a broad survey of the legal rules controlling the formation, financing, operation, governance and dissolution of business enterprises. It provides an overview to agency principles and the legal entities through which business activities are carried out, including partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. The primary focus of the course is on the corporate form of doing business, with an emphasis on the roles of management and shareholders, fiduciary obligations, and the anti-fraud provisions governing securities trading.

  • This course examines the scope of federal powers, the separation powers, the federal system, due process, equal protection, and the First Amendment.

  • This course examines the scope of federal powers, the separation powers, the federal system, due process, equal protection, and the First Amendment.

  • This course involves constitutional analysis of search and seizure, self-incrimination and the right to counsel.

  • This course examines the law relating to relevance, special exclusionary rules, privileged communications, the hearsay rule and its exception, the opinion rules, authentication and the best evidence rule, impeachment and rehabilitiation, presumptions, burdens of proof and characher evidence.

  • This course examines relevant codes and cases in an attempt to better understand a lawyer's ethical obligations and conflicts.

  • All J.D. candidates who initiated their studies at TJSL after August 1, 2008, must pass at least one course designated a professional skills course in order to graduate. Each semester, a list of those courses that would satisfy the professional skills requirement will be distributed along with the course schedule and registration information. Certain courses might be used to satisfy either the professional skills or upper-level writing requirement, but a student may not use one course to satisfy both requirements.

  • This course focuses on the law relating to various types of real property interests, including freehold and non-freehold estates, future interests, landlord-tenant relationships, conveyancing, and the use of land.

  • This course focuses on the law relating to various types of real property interests, including freehold and non-freehold estates, future interests, landlord-tenant relationships, conveyancing, and the use of land.

  • This course addresses the theory and practice of the law relating to the various forms of legal and equitable relief, including: various measures of damages for both tort and contract cases; specific forms of relief such as replevin, ejectment and specific performance; injunctive relief; and legal and equitable forms of restitutionary remedies.

  • The upper level writing requirement is an advanced writing project that must be completed after a student has completed Legal Writing II and before the student begins his or her final semester of law school. A student may not leave the upper level writing requirement until his or her final semester without prior approval of an Academic Counselor. To fulfill the upper level writing requirement, students must enroll in an approved course or directed study and satisfactorily complete the assignments. A list of approved courses is provided each semester with registration materials, and students can seek the assistance of an Academic Counselor to help identify a mentor for a directed study.

     

    Satisfactory completion of the assignments in any of the approved courses will include a final written product that meets professional standards both in its substance and in its writing style; and a final product or products that are equal in length and difficulty to a high quality appellate brief or publishable note; and one of the following: at least two drafts of two or more of the writing assignments; or a series of assignments related to one substantial writing assignment, such as a sequence that includes a research plan or a research log, a detailed outline, and at least two drafts. Certain courses might be used to satisfy either the professional skills or upper-level writing requirement, but a student may not use one course to satisfy both requirements.