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LISTED BELOW ARE THE INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR UPCOMING SEMESTERS.  AS YOU CONTINUE TO SCROLL DOWN YOU WILL FIND ASSIGNMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMESTERS:

  • Fall 2016 - Incoming Students

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INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS FOR Fall 2016 - Incoming Students

 

Listed below are the initial assignments that need to be completed prior to your first class session. Please review your schedule and complete the assignments for your assigned classes.

 

 

 

INITIAL ASSIGNMENTS – Incoming Students

FALL 2016

Course

Assignment

Civil Procedure I
§103.1

Professor Rierson

This assignment will cover class on Monday, August 15, and Wednesday, August 17.

 

Required Reading:

Jonathan Harr, A Civil Action. We will use the lawsuit described in this book to illustrate many of the procedural issues addressed in the course.

 

Glannon, Perlman, & Raven-Hansen, Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (2d ed. 2014): 3-36 (Introduction); 39-88 (Subject Matter Jurisdiction - Diversity).

 

Joseph W. Glannon, Civil Procedure: Examples & Explanations (7th ed. Wolters Kluwer 2013): 89-107 (Diversity).

 

Optional Reading:

Joseph W. Glannon, The Glannon Guide to Civil Procedure: Learning Civil Procedure Through Multiple-Choice Questions and Analysis (3d ed. Wolters Kluwer 2013): 3-25 (Diversity).

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.2

Professor Rierson

This assignment will cover class on Monday, August 15, and Wednesday, August 17.

 

Required Reading:

Jonathan Harr, A Civil Action. We will use the lawsuit described in this book to illustrate many of the procedural issues addressed in the course.

 

Glannon, Perlman, & Raven-Hansen, Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (2d ed. 2014): 3-36 (Introduction); 39-88 (Subject Matter Jurisdiction - Diversity).

 

Joseph W. Glannon, Civil Procedure: Examples & Explanations (7th ed. Wolters Kluwer 2013): 89-107 (Diversity).

 

Optional Reading:

Joseph W. Glannon, The Glannon Guide to Civil Procedure: Learning Civil Procedure Through Multiple-Choice Questions and Analysis (3d ed. Wolters Kluwer 2013): 3-25 (Diversity).

 

Civil Procedure I
§103.3

Professor Wildenthal

The assigned textbooks are:

(1) Glannon, Perlman & Raven-Hansen, Civil Procedure: A Coursebook (Wolters Kluwer, 2d ed. 2014) ("GPR"); and

(2) Glannon, Civil Procedure: Examples & Explanations (Wolters Kluwer, 7th ed. 2013) ("E&E").

 

​The publisher provides a discount rate for buying both as a package; using the following ISBN:​ 9781454880752. However, you should also look at Amazon and other sources for rental and other possible lower price options. You do need to obtain the latest editions indicated, but some lower-priced used copies of those editions are available.

 

Where a provision of the U.S. Constitution (“U.S. Const.”), a section of the federal statutes (laws) in the United States Code (“U.S.C.”), or Federal Rule of Civil Procedure (“FRCP”) is assigned, you are generally responsible for locating and obtaining that reading yourself online (though the professor will make available to you a convenient PDF of the entire U.S Constitution, and may provide PDFs of other primary rule or statute assignments). These are readily available on legal-research services like Westlaw or Lexis, and also by simply Googling the relevant provision, e.g., “frcp 12” or “28 usc 1441” (Cornell Law School’s legal research website, for example, is an especially convenient and reliable source and will often appear at the top of a Google search).

 

Assigned readings for the first 4 classes are as follows:

Class 1 (Tuesday, August 16):

Introduction to the American court system; the “diversity” branch of federal court subject-matter jurisdiction (“SMJ”).

 

GPR pp. 3-18 (ch. 1) and 39-88 (ch. 3) (through ch. 3, pt. II); E&E ch. 5 (pp. 89-107); U.S. Const. Art. III, § 1, and § 2, cls. 1-2, and Amdt. XI; 28 U.S.C. § 1332(a)-(c) and (e).

Class 2 (Thursday, August 18):

The federal question (“FQ”) branch of federal SMJ.

 

GPR pp. 89-123 (ch. 4); E&E ch. 4 (pp. 63-87); 28 U.S.C. § 1331.

Class 3 (Tuesday, August 23):

Removal of cases from state to federal court, and general review of SMJ.

 

GPR pp. 125-42 (ch. 5); E&E ch. 7 (pp. 123-39); 28 U.S.C. §§ 1441(a), (b), and (f), 1446(a), (b), and (c)(1), and 1447(a)-(c).

Class 4 (Thursday, August 25):

Introduction to personal jurisdiction (“PJ”), focusing on specific PJ: Pennoyer to Burger King.

 

GPR pp. 145-76 (ch. 6) and pp. 182-210 (ch. 7, pts. I.B-II); E&E ch. 1 (pp. 3-25); U.S. Const. Amdt. V (Due Process Clause) and Amdt. XIV, § 1 (Due Process Clause); FRCP 4(k)(1)(A) and (2).

 

 

Contracts I
§101.1

Professor Templin

The reading for the first week will be sent to you by email as a PDF by August 8.

 

Contracts I
§101.2

Professor Templin

The reading for the first week will be sent to you by email as a PDF by August 8.

 

Contracts I
§101.3

Professor Lee

Introduction to the Study of Contract Law and Problem 1-1: read pages 1-17 in the casebook

Criminal Law
§105.2

Dean Keller

(1) Read as background information for the course:

Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 1 - 19 (stop at “The Presentation of Evidence”)

Dressler, Understanding Criminal Law, §§3.01 to 3.03

 

(2) Read and be prepared to discuss:

Kadish et al, Criminal Law and Its Processes [Casebook], pp. 31-36 (“Proof Beyond Reasonable Doubt” through note 4)

 

Readings on Theories of Punishment, in Casebook:

A. Introduction: 75-82; Why Punish? Introductory Note, at 89-91

B. Utilitarian View: 91-93

C. Retribution: 93-100 (through Note on Retribution as Constraint)

D. Deterrence: 111-114

E. Rehabilitation: Vitiello and Moore, 115-116; Note – Does Rehabilitation Work?, at 117-118

F. Incapacitation: 120-124

 

(3) Prepare your answers for the Worksheet on Theories of Punishment – see TWEN Criminal Law – Keller Fall 2016 coursepage under Syllabus/Schedule of Assignments. {You will receive information on how to access TWEN via Westlaw during Week One.}

 

Lawyering Skills

All sections

All Professors

Read Lindh v. Surman (in Reading Like a Lawyer and posted on TWEN)

Review McKinney, Chapter 10-12 & Schwartz, pp. 149-158

Sign up for Lawyering Skills on TWEN

Suggested Reading:

Christensen, Ch. 4; Herald, Chs. 3-4

 

Legal Writing I
§099.1

Professor Christensen

Read: Dernbach, Chapters 1-3.

The syllabus will be posted on TWEN.

Legal Writing I
§099.2

Professor Day

No initial assignment

 

Legal Writing I
§099.3

Professor Durst

Read: Dernbach pp. 3-16 and chap. 3; prepare Exercise 3A.

 

 

Legal Writing I
§099.4

Professor Slattery

Welcome to Legal Writing I. In preparation for our first class, you should complete and be prepared to discuss items A, B, C, D, and E, below. Please be sure to register for the correct section of Legal Writing I on TWEN (you’ll see my name next to the course title), and be sure to use the assignment sheet posted in the “Assignment Drop Box” folder for “Class 1” to turn in the assignments described in item C, below. Note also that the items listed under C and D, below, are due by 9:00am on the day of our first class (so I can review them and prepare accordingly).

(A) Read Suzanne E. Rowe, Legal Research, Legal Writing and Legal Analysis, and Lawrence M. Friedman, Law in America [excerpt] in the Legal Writing I Workbook (pages 217-end).

(B) Read pages 1-14 (Introduction & Case Briefing) in the Legal Writing I Workbook.

(C) Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 in A Practical Guide to Legal Writing & Legal Method (Dernbach). You should work through all of the relevant exercises in Dernbach, but you will turn in only two exercises: Exercise 1-B (parts 1 & 2) and Exercise 3-A (Toad v. Ulrich case brief, using the case briefing method described in Chapter 3).

SPECIAL NOTES for PART C: for Part 2 of Exercise 1-B, above, the goal is to create ONE rule that brings together each of the reasons you gave for your conclusions in Part 1 a-d. In doing so, note the question you answered for each question in Part 1, namely, whether someone has a valid defense. When turning to Part 2, carry that mindset forward, and try wording your rule like a definition for what a valid defense is or is not, incorporating specific details (e.g., “A person has a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________”; or “It is not a valid defense when _____________, _____________, or ____________, unless ____________.”). In doing so, you may find yourself revising your answers to Part 1, which is perfectly fine.

Please be sure to type your answers directly into the assignment sheet posted in the Class 1 assignment dropbox on TWEN, and limit yourself to one page for each exercise. Please use full sentences and paragraphs, not bullet-points; I use these assignments to assess your ability to follow directions, assess your current reasoning skills, and to get a sense of your basic writing ability. Please spend no more than 60 minutes on each assignment.

(D) Read the entire course syllabus before our first class (an electronic version will be posted on the TWEN page for this course, in a folder titled “Syllabus”).

(E) Point your web browser to http://www.questionpress.com/slattery, click on “Enroll” and answer the Warm-Up, Reflective Prompt, and Questionnaire #1 questions you’ll find posted there.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.5

Professor Day

No initial assignment.

Legal Writing I
§099.6

Professor Durst

Read: Dernbach pp. 3-16 and chap. 3; prepare Exercise 3A.

 

 

Legal Writing I
§099.7

Professor Wright

READ: Dernbach text, pages 3-40 (through Exercise 3A) and Legal Writing I Workbook (WB), pages 1-14, and 217-end.

BRING TO CLASS: Dernbach, Exercises 1-B and 3-A (two copies – one to turn in and one to use in class); Short (2-3 page) biography to turn in.

 

Legal Writing I
§099.8

Professor Christensen

Read: Dernbach, Chapters 1-3.

The syllabus will be posted on TWEN.

Torts I
§111.1

Professor Dyson

The assignment combines the ideal mixture of reading cases, practicing exercises and studying doctrinal concepts. I encourage you to focus on each of these three for each assignment throughout the entire semester, including those optionally recommended, in order to do and be your best.

 

Please Read Cases: Prosser, Wade & Schwartz casebook:

 

Battery--

(1) Wallace v. Rosen case; Fisher v. Carrousel Motors

Assault--

(1) I de s et ux v. W de S

(2) Western Union v. Telegraph Co v. Hill

----

Please practice exercises: Glannon on Torts (Optional, But Recommended): Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault.

 

Please read intent doctrine: Diamond et al., Understanding Torts, p. 3-4 Please view: (Optional, But Recommended).

Torts I
§111.2

Professor Dyson

The assignment combines the ideal mixture of reading cases, practicing exercises and studying doctrinal concepts. I encourage you to focus on each of these three for each assignment throughout the entire semester, including those optionally recommended, in order to do and be your best.

 

Please Read Cases: Prosser, Wade & Schwartz casebook:

 

Battery--

(1) Wallace v. Rosen case; Fisher v. Carrousel Motors

Assault--

(1) I de s et ux v. W de S

(2) Western Union v. Telegraph Co v. Hill

----

Please practice exercises: Glannon on Torts (Optional, But Recommended): Read chapters on Battery & Assault & then complete all practice exercises on Battery & Assault.

 

Please read intent doctrine: Diamond et al., Understanding Torts, p. 3-4 Please view: (Optional, But Recommended).

Torts I
§111.3

Professor Bisom-Rapp

Required Reading:

 

Please note that the new editions of the course casebook (Schwartz et al.) and treatise (Diamond et al.) are required for this course. Although these books are pricey, they will be used again in Torts II during spring 2017. Thus, the books you are purchasing will carry you through the entire first year of Torts. In contrast, I am assigning an older edition of the required hornbook (Glannon). You should look for this book on Amazon or via any used bookseller. This book will also carry you through the entire first year of Torts.

 

Casebook: Schwartz, Kelly and Partlett, PROSSER, WADE, SCHWARTZ, KELLY, AND

PARTLETT’S TORTS, Thirteenth Edition, Foundation Press, 2015. (PR)

 

Treatise: Diamond, Levine and Bernstein, UNDERSTANDING TORTS, Fifth Edition, Lexis, 2013. (UT)

 

Hornbook: Glannon, THE LAW OF TORTS: EXAMPLES AND EXPLANATIONS,

Fourth Edition, Aspen, 2010. (GL)

 

The reading assignments below cover the first two class sessions: Monday, August 15 and Wednesday, August 17, 2016.

Week Topic PR GL  UT            
1 Introduction 1-4 (Do not read Hulle)
INTENTIONAL TORTS  
  Concept of Intent 17-20 3-5 3-4
    notes 22-24 (Do not read Spivey)   (1.01A-C)
    25-29   5-6
        (1.01E-F)

 

 

Torts I
§111.4

Professor Waldman

Required Reading:

 

Please note that the new editions of the course casebook (Schwartz et al.) and treatise (Diamond et al.) are required for this course. Although these books are pricey, they will be used again in Torts II during spring 2017. Thus, the books you are purchasing will carry you through the entire first year of Torts. In contrast, I am assigning an older edition of the required hornbook (Glannon). You should look for this book on Amazon or via any used bookseller. This book will also carry you through the entire first year of Torts.

 

Casebook: Schwartz, Kelly and Partlett, PROSSER, WADE, SCHWARTZ, KELLY, AND

PARTLETT’S TORTS, Thirteenth Edition, Foundation Press, 2015. (PR)

 

Treatise: Diamond, Levine and Bernstein, UNDERSTANDING TORTS, Fifth Edition, Lexis, 2013. (UT)

 

Hornbook: Glannon, THE LAW OF TORTS: EXAMPLES AND EXPLANATIONS,

Fourth Edition, Aspen, 2010. (GL)

 

The reading assignments below cover the first two class sessions: Monday, August 15 and Wednesday, August 17, 2016.

Week Topic PR GL  UT            
1 Introduction 1-4 (Do not read Hulle)
INTENTIONAL TORTS  
  Concept of Intent 17-20 3-5 3-4
    notes 22-24 (Do not read Spivey)   (1.01A-C)
    25-29   5-6
        (1.01E-F)