Meera E. Deo

 
Meera E. Deo
Meera E. Deo
Associate Professor of Law
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles;
J.D., University of Michigan Law School;
B.A., University of California, Berkeley, with high honors
Phone: (619) 961-4227

Meera E. Deo is a nationally-recognized interdisciplinary scholar who utilizes empirical methods to interrogate institutional diversity and affirmative action. During the 2013-14 academic year, Professor Deo is a Visiting Scholar with Berkeley Law’s Center for the Study of Law & Society (Fall) and a Visiting Professor at UCLA School of Law (Spring).

 

Professor Deo practiced civil rights law with the ACLU National Legal Department in New York City, where she worked on impact litigation involving privacy and cyberspace law.  She was later Staff Attorney for Women's Health, and Director of the Breast Cancer Legal Project at the California Women's Law Center, a statewide women’s advocacy nonprofit based in Los Angeles.  The National Science Foundation (NSF), the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship, and numerous University of California grants and awards supported her doctoral dissertation on social capital formation among members of law student organizations.  Professor Deo currently serves on the Executive Committee for the AALS Section on Law and the Social Sciences and is an appointee to the California Commission on Access to Justice.

 

Professor Deo’s interdisciplinary and empirical research on institutional diversity has been cited in numerous amicus briefs filed in the U.S. Supreme Court.  Her scholarship draws from original empirical research to investigate the law student and law faculty experience.  She is currently collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data for a landmark study of diversity in legal academia that examines how the intersectionality of race and gender affect tenure and promotion, work/life balance, institutional support, and other aspects of the personal and professional lives of American law faculty. She is a regular speaker at national and regional conferences including those organized by the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), Law & Society, the American Sociological Association (ASA), and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). Professor Deo’s  scholarship has been published in leading law journals around the country including Hastings Law Journal, the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, the Harvard Journal on Racial & Ethnic Justice, and the Journal of Legal Education.

 

Courses include:

Civil Procedure I & II, Law & Society, and Scholarly Legal Writing

Scholarships

ARTICLES, BOOK CHAPTERS, AND ARTICLE-LENGTH WORKS

Empirically-Derived Compelling State Interests in Affirmative Action Jurisprudence, 65 Hastings L.J. (forthcoming 2014), available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2315787

Two Sides of a Coin: Safe Space & Segregation in Race/Ethnic-Specific Law Student Organizations, 42 Wash. U. J.L. & Pol'y 83 (2013), available at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2097926

Book Review, The End of the Pipeline. A Journey of Recognition for African Americans Entering the Legal Profession, by Dorothy Evensen and Carla D. Pratt, 62 J. Legal Educ. 640 (2013), available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2285693

Separate, Unequal, and Seeking Support, 28 Harv. J. on Racial & Ethnic Just. 9 (2012)

The Social Capital Benefits of Peer Mentoring Relationships in Law School, 38 Ohio N.U. L. Rev. 305 (with Kimberly A. Griffin) (2011)

The Promise of Grutter: Diverse Interactions at the University of Michigan Law School, 17 Mich. J. Race & L. 63 (2011)

Paint by Number? How the Race & Gender of Law School Faculty Affect the First Year Curriculum, 29 Chicano-Latino L. Rev. 1 (2010) (first author, with Maria Woodruff and Rican Vue)

Struggles & Support: Diversity in U.S. Law Schools, 23 Nat’l. Black L.J. 71 (2010) (first author, with Walter R. Allen, A.T. Panter, Charles Daye, and Linda Wightman)

It Matters How and When You Ask: Self-Reported Race/Ethnicity of Incoming Law Students. 15 Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 51 (2009) (with A.T. Panter, Charles Daye, Walter R. Allen, and Linda Wightman)

Missing In Action: "Framing" Race on Prime Time Television, 35 Soc. Just. 145 (2008) (first author, with Christina Chin, Jenny J. Lee, Noriko Milman, and Nancy Wang Yuen)

Identifying Predictors of Law Student Life Satisfaction, 58 J. Legal Educ. 520 (2008) (with Nisha C. Gottfredson, A.T. Panter, Charles E. Daye, Walter T. Allen, and Linda F. Wightman)

India, Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society (2008) (edited by Richard T. Schaefer)

Without a Trace: Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders in Prime Time Television, in Contemporary Asian America: A Multidisciplinary Reader (with Christina Chin, Jenny Lee, Noriko Milman, and Nancy Wang Yuen) (Min Zhou and J.V. Gatewood eds., New York University Press, 2nd ed. 2007)

Ebbs & Flows: The Courts in Racial Context, 8 Rutgers Race & L. Rev. 167 (2007)

Asian Pacific Americans in Prime Time: Still No Action (with Christina Chin, Jenny J. Lee, Noriko Milman, and Nancy Wang Yuen) (Asian American Justice Center 2006)

Asian Pacific Americans in Prime Time: Lights, Camera, and Little Action (with Christina Chin, Jenny J. Lee, Noriko Milman, and Nancy Yuen)( National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium 2005)

Presentations

Empirically Derived Compelling State Interests in Affirmative Action Jurisprudence, Yale Law School, New Haven, CT (March 26, 2014)

Racial Isolation & Diversity in Law School, Yale Law School, New Haven, CT (March 26, 2014)

Diversity in Legal Academia , The Case for Diversity and Affirmative Action in the Wake of Fisher and Schuette, University of California, Berkley, School of Law, Berkley, CA (March 3, 2014)

Empirically Derived Compelling State Interests, The Case for Diversity and Affirmative Action in the Wake of Fisher and Schuette, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, Berkeley, CA (March 3, 2014)

The Future of Law School Diversity, AALS Annual Meeting, Presidential Workshop on Tomorrow’s Law Schools, panel on Law Professors of the Future, New York City (January 5, 2014)

Some Hypotheses for an Empirical Analysis of Law Faculty Diversity, Southern California Junior Faculty Workshop, California Western School of Law , Fullerton, CA (May 14, 2013)

Some Hypotheses for an Empirical Analysis of Law Faculty Diversity, Southern California Junior Faculty Workshop, , California Western School of Law , Fullerton, CA (May 14, 2013)

Preliminary Findings from the Diversity in Legal Academia Project, Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice Symposium, Berkeley Law, Berkeley (March 8, 2013)

Innovations in Mixed-Method Empirical Research, AALS Annual Meeting, Law & the Social Sciences Panel, New Orleans (January 7, 2013)

Two Sides of a Coin: Safe Space and Segregation in Race/Ethnic-Specific Law Student Organizations , Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV (November 16, 2012)

News

  • Professor Meera Deo Awarded 2014 Neil Gotanda Speakership
    February 6, 2014
      Professor Meera Deo has been invited to be the Asian American Law Journal's 2014 Neil Gotanda Speaker. Her remarks will be featured during...
  • November 26, 2013
    On November 18, TJSL Professor Meera  Deo met in San Francisco with Erica Gonzalez ’11 and Sahzad Banth ‘11. Profesesor Deo is a...
  • Meera Deo Berkeley
    July 26, 2013
    This fall TJSL Professor Meera Deo will be a Visiting Scholar at Berkeley Law's Center for the Study of Law & Society (CSLS).   “...
  • Tenure & Promotions for Four TJSL Faculty Members
    June 24, 2013
    TJSL Dean Rudy Hasl is pleased to report that the Board of Trustees, at its June 6 meeting, approved the recommendations of the faculty and the Dean...
  • Valedictorian Walter Araujo
    May 16, 2013
    May 2013 Valedictorian Walter Araujo looks back with pride at his time spent at Thomas Jefferson School of Law. And that’s not surprising when...

Expertise

Civil Litigation

Civil Rights

  • Affirmative Action
  • Race & Law / Race & Higher Education

Education Law

Evidence-Based Law and Policy

Minorities and the Law